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'Star Trek' fans rejoice! Holodeck spotted in L.A. park

The Holodeck has beamed down to Earth.

Who hasn't dreamed of stepping onto the Holodeck, to be virtually whisked off to wherever your heart desires — whether that be to a Vulcan baseball game or into a thrilling Sherlock Holmes mystery? Now, thanks to the inspired efforts of a "Star Trek" fan, you can (well, kind of.)

Sitting, unassuming, in a city park in Los Angeles, are two Holodeck control panels fit for a Federation Starship. So how did they get there? Short answer: the power of "Star Trek" fans.

Trekkie Arthur Chadwick was running through North Hollywood Park in Los Angeles and spotted two plain, metal pylons that he thought could use a fresh update. "Everyday I run past these pylons. so i fixed them," Chadwick wrote on Instagram

Related: What makes a 'Star Trek' fan? Costumed Trekkies share stories 

Chadwick employed the help of Dangling Carrot Creative to create large vinyl stickers to fit the previously plain pylons. The new stickers transformed the metal structures into Holodeck control panels, which Chadwick named "Holodeck 9" on Instagram. 

Since the Holodeck panels went up, Trek fans have been flocking to the park, enjoying the sight on their runs and posing in front of the panels for pictures, holding up the Vulcan salute and "working the controls." And, while no one has reported the panels functioning as they would on the USS Enterprise, they remain a festive fixture in the park. 

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Email Chelsea Gohd at cgohd@space.com or follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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Chelsea Gohd

Chelsea Gohd joined Space.com as an intern in the summer of 2018 and returned as a Staff Writer in 2019. After receiving a B.S. in Public Health, she worked as a science communicator at the American Museum of Natural History and even wrote an installation for the museum's permanent Hall of Meteorites. Chelsea has written for publications including Scientific American, Discover Magazine Blog, Astronomy Magazine, Live Science, All That is Interesting, AMNH Microbe Mondays blog, The Daily Targum and Roaring Earth. When not writing, reading or following the latest space and science discoveries, Chelsea is writing music and performing as her alter ego Foxanne (@foxannemusic). You can follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd.