Skip to main content

Space Chat with Space.com: Tune in Fridays for science, space and more!

This Friday (Nov. 27), "Space Chat" will dive into the Arecibo Observatory, which will be decommissioned. 

This week, Space.com staff writer Chelsea Gohd will be discussing and taking questions live about the famed Arecibo radio telescope, which will be shut down following damages to the facility that cannot be repaired safely. 

Every Friday at 1 p.m. EDT (17000 GMT), Gohd hosts our brand new series Space Chat. Each episode of the series, which will run live on Space.com's Facebook page, will explore a new spacetastic topic, spanning from Earth to the universe and far, far beyond. 

Related: Science & Astronomy News at Space.com

If this sounds good to you, you can actually get involved and be a part of Space Chat. During the live broadcast, Gohd will be answering questions from the Space.com community. You can leave your question in the comments section of the live video or, before the video goes live, you can  post your question on any of Space.com's social media channels (you can find us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.) 

Do you have a specific topic you'd like Gohd to discuss in a future Space Chat episode? Are you passionate about nebulas? Curious about NASA's James Webb Space Telescope? Wanting to take a deep dive into astrobiology and the search for life? 

Post your suggestion for future episode topics to any of Space.com's social media channels. Also, if you're looking to stay actively involved in the Space.com community, feel free to chat with other space enthusiasts over in our Space.com Forums here

Follow Chelsea Gohd on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.

  • IG2007
    We are supposed to ask questions, so, I am gonna ask some. :D

    Are whiteholes possible? If yes, then, why haven't we yet discovered one, is it because we don't have enough technology or anything else? If not, then, why not?

    Are there more elementary forces? Can anything be smaller than the higgs boson?

    And last, but not the least, will we ever have a theory of everything? What will our reactions be like when we really have one?

    Hope that isn't too much. :) :D
    Reply