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SpaceX's Crew-1 astronaut launch for NASA: Live updates

SpaceX plans to launch the first operational flight of its Crew Dragon astronaut taxi to the International Space Station on Nov. 15. Called Crew-1, this will be the second Crew Dragon mission to carry astronauts. NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker, along with JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi, will lift off from the historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 7:27p.m. EST (0027 GMT) to begin a six-month mission.

Space.com will bring  you all the latest updates on the Crew-1 mission here. 

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Crew-1 Press Conference today!

This screenshot shows the welcome ceremony for SpaceX Crew-1 astronauts (bottom, from left) Shannon Walker, Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins and Soichi Noguchi, who arrived at the International Space Station on the night of Nov. 16, 2020. In the back row are NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov, who have been living on the orbiting lab since October 2020.

(Image credit: NASA TV)

The astronauts of SpaceX's Crew-1 mission for NASA will hold a press conference from the International Space Station today (Nov. 19) and you can watch it live in the window at the top of this page. It will begin at 9:55 a.m. EST (1455 GMT).

The Crew-1 astronauts launched to the space station Sunday (Nov. 15) and arrived at the orbiting lab 27 hours later on Monday to begin a six-month mission to the orbiting lab. Their mission is SpaceX's first operational crewed flight for NASA using the company's Falcon 9 rockets and Crew Dragon spacecraft.

The Crew-1 mission is commanded by NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins with fellow NASA astronaut Victor Glover as pilot. NASA astronaut Shannon Walker and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi serve as mission specialists.

Docking Success

SpaceX's Crew-1 Dragon Resilience has successfully docked with the International Space Station

The spacecraft made a "soft capture" docking at 11:01 p.m. EST (0401 GMT), parking itself at the station's forward-facing port on the U.S. Harmony connecting node. The spacecraft will slow pull itself into a hard capture position to secure itself to the space station and ensure airtight seals between the two spacecraft. 

At the time of docking, Resilience and the space station were flying 262 miles above Idaho, NASA says. 

Tonight's docking marks SpaceX's first operational crew taxi flight to the space station for NASA. 

Read our full story on the historic docking here from Associate Editor Hanneke Weitering.

SpaceX Crew Dragon on Final Approach to ISS

After a 27-hour chase, SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft is closing in on the International Space Station. The spacecraft is expected to dock itself on the forward end of the station's Harmony module. 

A short time ago, SpaceX and NASA gave Crew Dragon the "GO" for docking. 

The Crew-1 Dragon is currently 15 meters away and three minutes from docking.

Here's a Tour of SpaceX's Crew-1 Dragon (Baby Yoda, included)

The Crew-1 astronauts just beamed a short tour of their Crew Dragon home in space, and yes there's lots of Baby Yoda. 

Crew-1 commander Mike Hopkins, pilot Victor Glover and mission specialists Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi gave a brief glimpse of what life is like inside the Crew Dragon spacecraft. Photobombing the event was the crew's "zero-g indicator," a small plush toy of The Child from the "Star Wars" TV series "The Mandalorian," which bobbed into view several times in the tour. 

Walker also gave viewers a look at how astronauts spin their water bottles to drink in space, while Noguchi offered a glimpse and the spacecraft's storage area beneath its seats. 

Space Station Spots Crew-1 Dragon

SpaceX's Crew-1 Crew Dragon spacecraft Resilience is seen from a distance of 200 kilometers in this zoomed-in view from the International Space Station on Nov. 16, 2020.

SpaceX's Crew-1 Crew Dragon spacecraft Resilience is seen from a distance of 200 kilometers in this zoomed-in view from the International Space Station on Nov. 16, 2020. (Image credit: NASA TV)

Cameras have spotted the Crew 1 Crew Dragon from a distance of 200 kilometers ahead of tonight's docking. 

"Can they see us waving?" asked Crew-1 commander Mike Hopkins of the station astronauts.

Crew-1 Shares View of Earth from Crew Dragon

The Crew-1 astronauts are beaming a stunning view of Earth from space through one of the Crew Dragon windows.  

"I wish you all could be up here with us, but rest assured you're up here with us in spirit," NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins radioed SpaceX's flight controllers. 

A televised event is scheduled for 4:48 pm ET/1:48 p.m. PT/2148 GMT on NASA TV.

Crew-1 Astronauts Prepare for Docking Day

The Crew-1 astronauts are working through their first full day in space as they prepare to dock at the International Space station later tonight. 

Crew-1 commander Michael Hopkins, pilot Victor Glover and mission specialists Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi are expected to arrive at the space station at about 11 p.m. EST (0400 Nov. 17 GMT). Their SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule, called Resilience, will dock itself at a forward-facing port on the station's Harmony module. 

SpaceX Crew-1 Astronauts: Video Vignettes

The four Crew-1 astronauts are currently sleeping on their SpaceX Crew Dragon Resilience and are due to awake at 12:10 p.m. EST (1710 GMT) after a nice 8 hours of sleep. 

Here's a look at the Crew-1 astronauts in video form while we await their start of Flight Day 2 in orbit and docking at the International Space Station, which is scheduled for 11 p.m. EST (0400 GMT).

Commander Mike Hopkins (NASA)

Pilot Victor Glover

Mission Specialist 1 Soichi Noguchi (JAXA)

Mission Specialist 2 Shannon Walker (NASA)

Baby Yoda Is On SpaceX's Crew-1 Dragon!

It's official: Baby Yoda is in space.

Last week, the Crew-1 astronauts on the Crew Dragon Resilience told reporters that they had picked a "zero gravity indicator" and that it would be pretty obvious what it was when the public saw it. But they weren't spilling the beans then on what the indicator, typically a toy that acts as a visual cue to show when the crew is experiencing weightlessness. 

But late tonight, cameras inside the Resilience spacecraft were switched on and there it was: The Child, AKA Baby Yoda, from the science fiction TV series "The Mandalorian." 

A "Baby Yoda" plush floats in the Crew Dragon spacecraft as the Crew-1 mission heads to the International Space Station, on Nov. 15, 2020. (Image credit: NASA TV)

A "Baby Yoda" plush floats in the Crew Dragon spacecraft as the Crew-1 mission heads to the International Space Station, on Nov. 15, 2020. (Image credit: NASA TV)

The Child is a baby Yoda-type creature from the "Star Wars" universe that made its first appearance last year in the first season of "The Mandalorian," a live-action "Star Wars" TV series on the streaming service Disney Plus. The character went viral in late 2019, particularly because its existence was kept secret until "The Mandalorian" debuted. 

Season 2 of "The Mandalorian" debuted last month, with the titular Mandalorian bounty hunter on a quest to return The Child (as it is called on the show) to its people. 

SpaceX Troubleshooting Heater Issue on Crew Dragon

SpaceX is troubleshooting an issue with some heaters for fuel lines on the Crew-1 Dragon Resilience. 

Flight controllers informed the Crew-1 astronauts that the three of four propellant line heaters were showing "high resistance" and marked as disabled in one part of the spacecraft's thruster system. Flight rules require two working heaters during the mission. 

The propellant line heaters are designed to keep the fuel lines above a temperature of 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Currently, the temperatures are holding steady at 75 F, SpaceX flight controllers said. 

SpaceX engineers are going through a series of tasks to reenable the affected thrusters. The Crew-1 spacecraft's upcoming pass over a ground station will enable more telemetry that could help that effort. 

Trump and Biden Hail SpaceX Launch

President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden have both issued statements via Twitter on today's successful Crew-1 astronaut launch by SpaceX. 

Trump said the launch was great, but said NASA was "a closed up disaster" when his administration took charge, and that under his leadership NASA is now the most advanced space center in the world. NASA was not closed up when the Trump administration began in 2017. NASA's Commercial Crew Program that led to today's launch was begun under the Obama administration in 2010. 

Biden, meanwhile, showered NASA and SpaceX with more traditional praise. 

Crew-1 Astronauts Settle Into Orbit

The Crew-1 astronauts have been given the go to get out of their SpaceX spacesuits and settle in aboard the Crew Dragon Resilience. They are also expected to break for for their midday meal soon. 

You can read our full story on Crew-1's launch success here.

"Well done, that was one heck of a ride. There was a lot of smiles," Crew-1 commander Mike Hopkins radioed to SpaceX flight controllers. "Making history is definitely hard and you guys all made it look easy. Congratulations to everyone. Resilience is in orbit."

Hopkins and the Crew-1 astronauts are scheduled to go to sleep at 5:25 a.m. (1025 GMT) on Monday morning to get eight hours of rest for their docking day. They should arrive at the space station on Monday night at about 11 p.m. EST (0400 Nov. 17 GMT).

Crew Dragon ‘Resilience’ safely in orbit

Following a spectacular nighttime launch of the Falcon 9 rocket from Florida’s Kennedy Space Center, Crew Dragon ‘Resilience’ and its crew of four astronauts are safely in orbit.

Crew Dragon has separated from the Falcon’s second stage, nosecone deploy is complete and the spacecraft is beginning its 27-hour approach to the International Space Station. Docking with the ISS is scheduled at approx. 11 PM EST on Monday, November 16th (0400 GMT 17 November).

The Falcon 9’s first stage successfully reentered and touched on SpaceX’s “Just Read the Instructions” drone recovery ship stationed offshore in the Atlantic Ocean.

LIFTOFF! Falcon 9 and Crew Dragon heading for orbit

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the Crew Dragon ‘Resilience’ spacecraft has lifted off from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A.

NASA Crew-1 commander Mike Hopkins and pilot Vic Glover are reporting that the launch vehicle and spacecraft are performing nominally as they commence the 12-minute climb to orbit.

Falcon 9 & Crew Dragon: T-minus 5 minutes and counting

The Crew Dragon spacecraft has transitioned to internal power for tonight's launch of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket at 7:27:17 p.m. EST (0027:17 GMT) from Launch Complex 39A at Florida’s Kennedy Space Center.

The Falcon 9 propellant tanks have been topped off with liquid oxygen (LOX) and rocket-grade kerosene (RP-1). As the countdown nears T-0, flight computers will assess the Falcon 9 engine steering system and the vehicle’s propellant tanks will be pressurized to flight pressure.

At T-minus 3.3 seconds, the engine controller commands the Merlin engines ignition sequence to commerce, building up to maximum power for launch.

In the Crew Dragon spacecraft, Crew-1 mission commander Mike Hopkins and pilot Vic Glover are conducting final launch preparations, assisted by mission specialists Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi.

No technical issues are being worked. Weather conditions are ‘Green.’ GO FOR LAUNCH!

Here’s a summary of the final countdown and ascent to orbit milestones:

-00:01:00 Command flight computer to begin final prelaunch checks
-00:01:00 Propellant tank pressurization to flight pressure begins
-00:00:45 SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for launch
-00:00:03 Engine controller commands engine ignition sequence to start
-00:00:00 Falcon 9 liftoff
+00:00:58 Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)
+00:02:33 1st stage main engine cutoff (MECO)
+00:02:36 1st and 2nd stages separate
+00:02:44 2nd stage engine starts
+00:07:15 1st stage entry burn
+00:08:47 2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO-1)
+00:08:52 1st stage entry burn
+00:09:22 1st stage landing
+00:12:00 Crew Dragon separates from 2nd stage
+00:12:46 Dragon nosecone open sequence begins 

Falcon 9 & Crew Dragon: T-minus 10 minutes and counting

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, with astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi onboard the Crew Dragon spacecraft, has been cleared for launch at 7:27:17 p.m. EST (0027:17 GMT). Weather conditions have markedly to permit a launch attempt tonight.

The mission management team has been polled and all have reported 'Go for launch.' The three veteran astronauts and one spaceflight rookie are strapped into their seats, running through pre-launch checklists and are closely monitoring spacecraft systems in preparation for their ascent to orbit.

No technical or vehicle issues are being worked at this time, with very little chatter on the internal communication loops. Weather conditions and the Eastern Range are ‘Green’ for launch.

Falcon 9 ‘GO’ for propellant load

Falcon 9 has been cleared to commence propellant loading. The SpaceX launch director has just given the OK to start fueling the first stage of the 215 foot-tall (65 meter) two-stage Falcon 9 launch vehicle, which is powered by liquid oxygen (LOX) and rocket-grade kerosene (RP-1). Fueling of the Falcon 9 is scheduled to begin at 6:52 p.m. EST (2352 GMT).

The crew access arm is being retracted and Crew Dragon’s emergency launch escape system will be armed, preparing the spacecraft to separate from the launch vehicle in the unlikely event of anomaly on the pad or during ascent. Once the system is armed, propellant loading will soon follow.

Crew Dragon features an advanced abort system with eight SuperDraco engines and a series of parachutes that can be activated instantaneously from the moment they are armed on the launch pad all the way through orbital insertion.
Vice President Mike Pence has just landed at the Kennedy Space Center to witness tonight’s historic launch attempt.

The SpaceX launch team is not working any technical issues at this time with Falcon 9 or Crew Dragon. Weather is currently ‘Green’ for launch; there is much optimism that conditions will remain acceptable for a launch attempt tonight.
Launch is scheduled for 7:27:17 p.m. EST (0027:17 GMT).

Countdown proceeding smoothly; weather forecast improves

The countdown is proceeding smoothly for this evening’s launch of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the Crew Dragon spacecraft. Liftoff is scheduled for 7:27:17 p.m. EST (00:27:17 GMT).

The spacecraft hatch has been re-sealed after technicians removed a piece of FOD (foreign object debris) that was causing a small leak; that issue has been resolved and the hatch has passed the leak check. Communication checks between the launch team, flight controllers and the spacecraft have been completed.

The launch team is carefully reviewing weather data to decide if fueling operations can commence. If weather continues to trend positive, the SpaceX launch director should give the OK to start loading propellants into the 215 foot-tall (65 meter) two-stage Falcon 9 launch vehicle. Falcon 9 is powered by liquid oxygen (LOX) and rocket-grade kerosene (RP-1). Fueling of the Falcon 9 is scheduled to begin at 6:52 p.m. EST (2352 GMT).

The launch team is not working any technical issues at this time. Weather forecasts are trending optimistic – a frontal boundary that concerned forecasters may not reach the Kennedy Space Center by launch time.

Crew Dragon hatch closed again for launch

The close-out crew reports that they may have identified the ‘root cause’ of the hatch leak. Crew Dragon’s hatch has been closed again and the cabin leak checks will resume.

Crew Dragon hatch being reopened

The close-out crew has reopened Crew Dragon’s hatch to investigate a pressure drop during a leak check after the hatch was initially closed.

Crew Dragon hatch closed for launch

Crew Dragon's hatch has been closed and latched for flight, the four astronauts are strapped into their seats and preparations are progressing smoothly for this evening’s Falcon 9 launch attempt from Launch Complex 39A at Florida's Kennedy Space Center - the first operational mission to the International Space Station in the Commercial Crew Program.
Crew-1 mission commander Mike Hopkins and pilot Vic Glover have completed air-to-ground communications checks to ensure that the four astronauts can talk to flight controllers and each other during the spacecraft's ascent to orbit. Suit leak checks have also been completed.
Launch is scheduled for 7:27:17 p.m. EST (0027:17 GMT). The launch team is not tracking any technical issues; launch weather forecast remains marginal, with a 50 percent probability of acceptable conditions at launch time.

Astronauts strapped-in for liftoff

The four Crew-1 astronauts – Mike ‘Hopper’ Hopkins, Victor ‘Ike’ Glover, Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi – are now strapped into their form-fitting car racing seats on Crew Dragon “Resilience.”

The astronauts have started a series of communications checks between the spacecraft, the launch team and Mission Control. Their seats will soon be rotated into their launch position and their spacesuits are being checked for leaks.
Launch is scheduled for 7:27:17 p.m. EST (0027:17 GMT). No technical issues are being worked at this time, the Eastern Range is ‘Green’ but weather remains questionable with a 50 percent probability of acceptable conditions for launch.

Astronauts entering Crew Dragon

The Crew-1 astronauts have begun entering their Crew Dragon ‘Resilience’ spacecraft.

NASA Crew-1 mission commander Mike Hopkins - call sign ‘Hopper’ - has assumed his position aboard Crew Dragon. Hopkins is the commander of the Crew Dragon spacecraft, responsible for all phases of flight, from launch to reentry. He'll also serve as an Expedition 64 Flight Engineer once aboard the ISS. A veteran of the Expedition 37/38 crew in 2013/14, Hopper logged 166 days in space and conducted two spacewalks. Hopkins is a colonel in the U.S. Air Force.

NASA Crew-1 pilot Victor Glover - call sign ‘Ike’ – will settle into his form-fitting seat, alongside mission commander Mike Hopkins.  A spaceflight rookie, Glover is second in command for the mission, responsible for spacecraft systems and performance. A U.S. Navy Commander, he will also be a long duration space station crew member.
NASA mission specialist Dr. Shannon Walker and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) mission specialist Soichi Noguchi will be seated behind the commander and pilot, offset to the left and right.


Mission specialist Walker will work closely with the commander and the pilot to monitor the vehicle during the dynamic launch and reentry phases of flight. Once onboard the space station, Walker will become a flight engineer for Expedition 64.  Dr. Walker launched to the ISS in 2010 aboard the Soyuz TMA-19 spacecraft as the copilot and spent 161 days aboard the orbiting laboratory.

Mission specialist Noguchi will closely watch timelines, telemetry and consumables during launch and reentry. Noguchi will also become a long duration crew member aboard the space station. A veteran of two spaceflights, STS-115 in 2005 and Soyuz TMA-17 in 2009, Noguchi became the first Japanese astronaut to perform a spacewalk outside of the space station. Crew Dragon will be the third type of spacecraft that Noguchi has flown to the orbiting laboratory, joining very select company - spaceflight legends Wally Schirra (Mercury, Gemini, Apollo) and John Young (Gemini, Apollo, Shuttle).

Launch is scheduled for 7:27:15 p.m. EST (0027:15 GMT). No technical issues are being worked at this time.

Crew-1 astronauts arrive at launch pad

Astronauts Mike Hopkins, Vic Glover, Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi have arrived at Launch Complex 39A where their SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is being readied for launch. 

The three spaceflight veterans (Hopkins, Walker and Noguchi) and one rookie (Glover) will ride an elevator up to the 255-foot level of the launch tower, walk across the glass-enclosed access arm, and enter the Crew Dragon spacecraft.
Launch is scheduled for 7:27:15 p.m. EST (0027:15 GMT) from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A. 

No technical issues are being worked at this time; weather remains marginal, with a 50/50 chance of acceptable conditions for launch.

What were the astronauts listening to on the short drive to the Pad 39A? Glad you asked, here's NASA and SpaceX's final countdown playlist for Crew-1:

Astronauts departing for launch pad

Astronauts Mike Hopkins, Vic Glover, Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi, sporting their custom-made SpaceX spacesuits, are walking out of the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building to begin their trip to Launch Complex 39A.
The Crew-1 astronauts briefly met with NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and SpaceX CEO Gwynne Shotwell before departing; the pair took ‘selfies’ (from a safe distance) with the crew.

The astronauts will ride in a pair of NASA logo-emblazoned Tesla Model X electric-powered SUVs during their 9-mile (14 km) drive to the launch pad where their Falcon 9 rocket and the Crew Dragon ‘Resilience’ spacecraft are being readied for launch. A convoy of three Teslas will drive to the launch pad; the astronauts will be riding in the 2nd and 3rd vehicles.

Launch is scheduled for 7:27:15 p.m. EST (0027:15 GMT) from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A.

The launch team is not working any technical issues at this time; the official weather forecast calls for a 50 percent probability of acceptable conditions at launch time. Winds and seas offshore are within limits; however, forecasters are concerned about showers moving in near launch time. 

Astronauts donning spacesuits

Astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi are now donning their custom-made spacesuits in the Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. They have just received a weather briefing

The stylized SpaceX spacesuits are designed to be functional, lightweight, and to offer protection from potential depressurization during ascent and orbital operations. The flight helmets are custom manufactured using 3D printing technology. Spacesuit gloves are designed to be compatible with Crew Dragon’s touchscreen controls.

Launch is scheduled for 7:27:15 p.m. EST (0027:15 GMT) from Kennedy Space Center’s historic Launch Complex 39A. Weather forecasts remain optimistic, with a 50% chance of favorable conditions at launch time.

Launch Day Begins!

It's launch day for SpaceX's Crew-1 astronaut launch for NASA and the four astronauts to ride the Crew Dragon Resilience to the International Space Station are ready for their flight. A SpaceX Falcon rocket will launch the mission at 7:27 p.m. EDT (0027 Nov. 16 GMT) from Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. 

The weather forecast currently offers a 50% chance of good conditions at launch.

You'll be able to watch the launch live on this page beginning at 3:15 p.m. EDT (1919 GMT). Crew-1 is commanded by NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, with fellow NASA astronaut Victor Glover as pilot. NASA astronaut Shannon Walker and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi round out the crew. 

Today's mission is SpaceX's first operational crew flight for NASA under the space agency's Commercial Crew Program and follows SpaceX's successful crewed test flight, Demo-2, which launched two astronauts to the station in May. 

Space.com contributor Robert Pearlman, editor of collectSPACE, has a rundown of the many firsts the Crew-1 mission is setting on this flight.

Here's the schedule for the Crew-1 astronauts today:

Time (EST): Event

6:57:15 AM: Crew Wake

1:57:15 PM: CE Launch Readiness Briefing

2:27:15 PM: Launch Shift On Console

2:27:16 PM: Dragon IMU align and Configure for launch

2:57:15 PM: Dragon prop pressurization

3:12:15 PM: Crew weather brief

3:22:15 PM: Crew handoff

3:27:15 PM: Suit donning and checkout

4:05:15 PM: Crew walk out from Neil Armstrong Operations & Checkout Building

4:12:15 PM: Crew Transportation to Launch Complex 39A

4:32:15 PM: Crew arrives at pad

4:52:15 PM: Crew ingress

5:07:15 PM: Communication check

5:12:15 PM: Verify ready for seat rotation

5:13:15 PM: Suit leak checks

5:32:15 PM: Hatch close

6:17:15 PM: ISS state upload to Dragon

6:42:15 PM: SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for propellant load

6:45:15 PM: Crew access arm retracts

6:49:15 PM: Dragon launch escape system is armed

6:52:15 PM: RP-1 (rocket grade kerosene) loading begins/1st stage LOX (liquid oxygen) loading begins 

7:11:15 PM: 2nd stage LOX loading begins

7:20:15 PM: Falcon 9 begins engine chill prior to launch

7:22:15 PM: Dragon transitions to internal power

7:26:15 PM: Command flight computer to begin final prelaunch checks Propellant tank pressurization to flight pressure begins

7:26:30 PM: SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for launch

7:27:12 PM: Engine controller commands engine ignition sequence to start

7:27:15 PM: Liftoff

7:29:13 PM: Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)

7:29:52 PM: 1st stage main engine cutoff (MECO)

7:29:55 PM: 1st and 2nd stages separate

7:30:03 PM: 2nd stage engine starts

7:34:44 PM: 1st stage entry burn

7:36:05 PM: 2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO-1)

7:36:44 PM: 1st stage landing

7:39:18 PM: Crew Dragon separates from 2nd stage

7:40:03 PM: Dragon nosecone open sequence begins

One Day to Launch

NASA and SpaceX are one day away from launching the Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station and the four-astronaut team is ready to fly. 

Read our full Crew-1 overview here to for a brief introduction to mission commander Mike Hopkins and crewmates Victor Glover, Shannon Walker  (all of NASA) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi. 

Join us on Sunday at 3:15 p.m. EST (1915 GMT) for complete coverage for SpaceX's countdown and launch of the Crew-1 Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon mission.

LAUNCH DELAY: Liftoff now set for Sunday, Nov. 15

SpaceX has postponed the Crew-1 astronaut launch for NASA until no earlier than Sunday, Nov. 15, due to unacceptable onshore winds and impacts to Falcon 9 rocket recovery operations at landing. 

Liftoff is now set for no earlier than Sunday, Nov. 15 at 7:27 p.m. EST (0027 GMT)

Read our full story here.

T-1 Day to Launch: Elon Musk tests positive for COVID-19

(Image credit: SpaceX/Elon Musk via Twitter)

With SpaceX and NASA now one day away from launching four astronauts to the International Space Station on the Crew-1 mission, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk announced on Twitter that he has received two positive tests for COVID-19 and two negative ones in a recent screening. 

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said today that he does not currently expect Musk's news to affect the Crew-1 launch on Saturday (Nov. 14). It is unclear if Musk is in Florida for the launch or at SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, California.

"We're looking for SpaceX to do any contact tracing that is appropriate," Bridenstine told reporters in a briefing today at NASA's countdown clock at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

SpaceX's Crew-1 mission is set to launch four astronauts to the space station at 7:49 p.m. EST (0049 Nov. 15 GMT) from Pad 39A at KSC. It is the first operational crew mission for NASA by SpaceX after the company's historic first crewed test flight, Demo-2, this summer. There is a 70% chance of good launch weather for the mission.

The Crew-1 mission will launch NASA astronauts Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins, Shannon Walker and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soicho Noguchi on a six-month mission to the station as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program. 

On Thursday, the Crew-1 astronauts conducted a dress rehearsal of their launch. They donned their sleek SpaceX-issue spacesuits and rode out to Pad 39A in a caravan of white Tesla vehicles. They also entered their Crew Dragon spacecraft (which the astronauts have dubbed "Resilience") to practice launch operations. 

The four astronauts of NASA and SpaceX's Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station pose for a portrait during a launch rehearsal at Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida on Nov. 12, 2020. They are (from left): Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi and NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Shannon Walker and Victor Glover.

The four astronauts of NASA and SpaceX's Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station pose for a portrait during a launch rehearsal at Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida on Nov. 12, 2020. They are (from left): Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi and NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Shannon Walker and Victor Glover. (Image credit: Soichi Noguci/JAXA/NASA)

Later today, NASA and SpaceX will hold a Launch Readiness Review meeting to make one last check that the Crew-1 mission is ready to fly. A NASA press conference will follow once that meeting is complete. NASA has not yet released a time for the briefing, but it will be webcast live and you can watch it here at start time.

Set to speak in that briefing are:

Steve Stich, manager, Commercial Crew Program, Kennedy

Joel Montalbano, manager, International Space Station, Johnson

Kirt Costello, chief scientist, International Space Station Program, Johnson

Norm Knight, deputy manager, Flight Operations Directorate, Johnson

Benji Reed, senior director, Human Spaceflight Programs, SpaceX

Arlena Moses, launch weather officer, U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron

With Falcon 9 static fire complete, Crew-1 astronauts prepare for launch

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket test fires its first-stage engines briefly atop Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida on Nov. 11, 2020. The rocket will launch the Crew-1 astronaut mission for NASA on Nov. 14. (Image credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky)

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket that will launch the Crew-1 mission conducted a static fire test yesterday (Nov. 11). During the test, the rocket briefly fired its engines while tied down, as a measure to ensure that the vehicle will perform properly during the launch on Saturday (Nov. 14).

With that milestone completed, the four astronauts on the Crew-1 mission are spending today (Nov. 12) conducting a dress rehearsal for launch. The crew and the NASA and SpaceX personnel supporting the mission will go through each step of the launch process — minus blast-off itself — to make sure the big day goes smoothly.

SpaceX Crew Dragon on the Launch Pad

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the Crew Dragon spacecraft on top stands ready for launch at Launch Complex 39A, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on Nov. 10, 2020. SpaceX plans to launch NASA's Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station on Nov. 14, 2020. (Image credit: SpaceX/Twitter)

The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft poised to launch four astronauts NASA's Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station this week has reached its launch pad. 

The Crew-1 spacecraft and its Falcon 9 rocket (also built by SpaceX) moved to NASA's historic Launch Pad 39A on Monday night (Nov. 9) and are now in launch position for a planned static fire engine test expected for later today. 

Meanwhile, NASA and SpaceX officials have completed their review of the Crew Dragon and Falcon 9 rocket for this launch and will hold a press conference at 3:30 p.m. EST (1930 GMT) to discuss their plans. You can watch that live on Space.com, courtesy of NASA. 

NASA, SpaceX review Crew-1 flight readiness

(Image credit: SpaceX)

NASA and SpaceX mission managers are holding a day-long Flight Readiness Review today (Nov. 9) to decide of SpaceX's next Crew Dragon to carry astronauts is ready to fly. 

The review is going on at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, where a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is gearing up to launch the Crew-1 mission to the space station for NASA.  "The review focuses on the preparedness of SpaceX’s crew transportation system, the International Space Station, and its international partners to support the flight, and the certification of flight readiness," NASA officials said in a statement.

NASA's human spaceflight chief Kathy Lueders is leading today's meeting. SpaceX's vice president for build and flight reliability Hans Koenigsmann is the top SpaceX representative. 

NASA will hold a press conference later today to discuss the results of today's Flight Readiness Review. That event should begin one hour after the meeting's conclusion.

The Crew-1 astronauts, meanwhile, will answer questions from the media at 1:15 p.m. EST (1815 GMT). You can watch that live here.

Crew-1 astronauts arrive at launch site

The four-astronaut crew of SpaceX's Crew-1 mission for NASA have arrived at their Kennedy Space Center launch site for their planned Nov. 14 launch to the International Space Station.

NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi touched down at the Shuttle landing Facility at KSC to prepare for their upcoming launch from the Cape Canaveral, Florida spaceport. Liftoff is set for 7:49 p.m. EST (2249 GMT) on Saturday. 

Hopkins will command the Crew-1 mission, which will launch to the station on a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket. The Crew-1 astronauts have named their spacecraft Resilience for the flight. 

"On behalf of the crew of Resilience, on behalf of our families, we want to say a big ‘thank you’ to all of the people at SpaceX, at NASA, and in the (Department of Defense) who have been working tirelessly to get us to this point. It's really been an incredible effort by an incredible group of people," Hopkins said in a statement. "As for the crew: we’re ready."

A crew arrival event for NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission is held Nov. 8, 2020, at the Launch and Landing Facility at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. From left are NASA astronaut Shannon Walker, mission specialist; NASA astronaut Victor Glover, pilot; Junichi Sakai, manager, International Space Station Program, JAXA; NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine; NASA Deputy Administrator Jim Morhard; Bob Cabana, director, Kennedy Space Center; NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, spacecraft commander; and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi, mission specialist.  (Image credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett)

On Monday (Nov. 9), NASA and SpaceX mission managers will hold a Flight Readiness Review meeting at the Kennedy Space Center to ensure all is ready for the upcoming flight. NASA will hold a press conference one hour after the meeting concludes to update the public on the launch. 

You can also join NASA's Virtual Crew Media Engagement webcast at 1:15 p.m. EST (1815 GMT) on Monday via NASA TV. You can watch that live online here and via NASA.gov/live and NASA's YouTube channel.

SpaceX, NASA target Nov. 14 for Crew-1 launch

SpaceX's Crew-1 astronauts (from left: NASA astronauts Shannon Walker, Victor Glover and Michael Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi) pose in front of their Crew Dragon capsule, "Resilience," at SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, California.  (Image credit: SpaceX)

SpaceX's Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station is now scheduled to launch on Saturday, Nov. 14, at 7:49 p.m. EST (0049 GMT on Nov. 15), NASA announced Monday (Oct. 26).

Originally scheduled to launch Aug. 30, Crew-1 has faced numerous delays in getting off the ground. NASA first pushed the mission to late September, then to Oct. 23, then to Oct. 31 and finally to early to mid-November, citing logistical and technical issues. The newly announced target date firms up that latter timeline.

NASA also announced that it will hold a news conference on Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 4 p.m. EDT (2000 GMT) "to discuss the upcoming launch, including results from recent testing of the Falcon 9 Merlin engines following unexpected data SpaceX noted during a recent non-NASA launch," the agency said in a statement. You can watch it live here on Space.com, courtesy of NASA TV, or directly via the agency's website