Partner Series

If you've got plans to celebrate this weekend's supermoon, the astronomy broadcasting service Slooh would like to hear about them. 

Slooh is soliciting your ideas for its "Supermoon Challenge," an interactive event that will complement its online coverage of the supermoon this Sunday (Dec. 3) at Slooh.com.

"So, what are you doing this supermoon?" Slooh representatives wrote in a statement. "Send your video, written thoughts, audio recordings, show or tell us how you are capturing the moon magic with #supermoonchallenge on Twitter and Facebook, and/or email us at editor@slooh.com."

The "supermoon" of Nov. 13, 2016, seen from the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles.
The "supermoon" of Nov. 13, 2016, seen from the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles.
Credit: Mélanie Barboni

Slooh's supermoon show, featuring live telescope views of Earth's nearest neighbor, will air Sunday at 9 p.m. EST (0200 GMT on Monday, Dec. 4). You can watch it at www.slooh.com or here at Space.com, courtesy of Slooh, when the time comes.

The moon orbits Earth on an elliptical path that brings the natural satellite about 31,000 miles (50,000 kilometers) nearer to us at closest approach (also known as perigee) than at its most distant point (apogee). When a full moon coincides with perigee, we get a supermoon, which appears about 14 percent larger and 30 percent brighter than an apogee full moon, or minimoon.

Supermoons aren't terribly rare — another one will occur in January — but they are nice to look at. So keep your eyes open Sunday!

Editor's note: If you capture an amazing view of the supermoon or any other night sky view that you would like to share with Space.com for a possible story or gallery, send images and comments in to: spacephotos@space.com.

Follow Mike Wall on Twitter @michaeldwall and Google+. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook or Google+. Originally published on Space.com.