Milky Way Over Maine's Penobscot River Captured in Stunning Photo
Astrophotographer A. Garrett Evans took this image of the Milky Way on March 12, 2016 at Sandy Point Beach in Stockton Springs, Maine.
Credit: A. Garrett Evans

At Sandy Point Beach in Maine, the Milky Way glowed over the still water when this stunning image was captured.

Astrophotographer A. Garrett Evans took this image on March 12 at Sandy Point Beach in Stockton Springs, Maine. Evans went to the beach with a friend both hoping to capture the Milky Way  over an old pier in the Penobscot River. 

"The skies were mostly clear and the temps were in the mid 30's which seemed a bit warm for this time of year, but that was welcomed," he wrote in an email to Space.com. [How to Photograph the Milky Way (Photos)]

Mars, Saturn, and Antares are the brightest objects visible in the sky in this image. They are located above and to the right of the galactic core of the Milky Way.

"The tide was going out and the water was extremely calm which created amazing reflections on the still water," Evans said.

Dust off your spiral arms and fatten up your bulge — it's time to tap into your inner galaxy to test your smarts about the Milky Way. Our home in space is a strange and wondrous place that scientists are still trying to figure out. See what you know!
The Milky Way Galaxy is organized into spiral arms of giant stars that illuminate interstellar gas and dust. The sun is in a finger called the Orion Spur.
0 of 10 questions complete
Milky Way Quiz: Test Your Galaxy Smarts
Dust off your spiral arms and fatten up your bulge — it's time to tap into your inner galaxy to test your smarts about the Milky Way. Our home in space is a strange and wondrous place that scientists are still trying to figure out. See what you know!
The Milky Way Galaxy is organized into spiral arms of giant stars that illuminate interstellar gas and dust. The sun is in a finger called the Orion Spur.
0 of questions complete

Evans used a Canon 6D with a Nikon 14-24 @14mm with a Novoflex adapter. Camera settings were ISO 6400, f/2.8, 25 seconds each. The image was processed through Lightroom and Photoshop. 

Editor's note: If you have an amazing skywatching photo you'd like to share it with Space.com and our news partners for a possible story or image gallery, please contact managing editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

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