NASA's Mars Rover 2020 Mission in Pictures (Gallery)

NASA Mars Rover 2020 Diagram

NASA/JPL-Caltech

A sketch of the design for NASA's 2020 Mars rover. Planning for NASA's 2020 Mars rover envisions a basic structure that capitalizes on re-using the design and engineering work done for the NASA rover Curiosity, which landed on Mars in 2012, but with new science instruments selected through competition for accomplishing different science objectives with the 2020 mission. See images of NASA's Mars 2020 rover mission in this Space.com gallery.

NASA Mars Rover 2020: Michael Meyer

NASA/Bill Ingalls

Michael Meyer, lead scientist, Mars Exploration Program, gives remarks during a press briefing where it was announced what instruments will be carried aboard the agency’s Mars 2020 mission, Thursday, July 31, 2014 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The new rover will carry more sophisticated, upgraded hardware and new instruments to conduct geological assessments of the rover's landing site, determine the potential habitability of the current environment, and directly search for signs of ancient Martian life -- something no previous Mars mission has done. Read the full story here.

NASA Mars Rover 2020 Science Instruments

NASA

An artist concept image of where seven carefully-selected instruments will be located on NASA’s Mars 2020 rover. The instruments will conduct unprecedented science and exploration technology investigations on the Red Planet as never before. Read the full story here.

NASA Mars Rover 2020: Supercam

NASA

This artist's illustration shows how NASA's Mars 2020 rover will use Supercam, a laser instrument that can provide imaging, chemical composition analysis, and mineralogy. Read the full story here.

PIXL Arm-Mounted Sensor Head

NASA

One proposed payload experiment for the Mars 2020 rover is the Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry (PIXL), an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. It will contain an imager with high resolution to analyze the fine-scale elemental composition of Martian surface materials.

Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry (PIXL) Views

NASA

Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry (PIXL) will produce views like this on the Mars 2020 rover.

Radar Imager for Mars' Subsurface Exploration (RIMFAX)

NASA

One proposed payload experiment for the Mars 2020 rover is the Radar Imager for Mars' Subsurface Exploration (RIMFAX). It is a ground-penetrating radar that can provide centimeter-scale resolution of the geologic structure of the subsurface.

Mars Rover 2020 Science Payload Unveiled

NASA/Bill Ingalls

NASA unveiled the science instruments for its huge Mars 2020 rover during a press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, D.C., on July 31, 2014. Pictured from left are: Dwayne Brown, NASA senior public affairs officer, left, John Grunsfeld, astronaut and associate administrator for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the NASA Human Exploration and Operations Directorate, Michael Meyer, lead scientist, Mars Exploration Program, and Ellen Stofan, NASA chief scientist. Read the full story here.

Mars Rover 2020: MOXIE

NASA

NASA's Mars 2020 rover mission will carry an innovative instrument called MOXIE aimed at demonstration the potential of resource utilization on the Red Planet. MOXIE ( Mars Oxygen ISRU Experiment) is designed to create oxygen using Mars' native carbon dioxide. Read the full story here.

Mars Rover 2020: Mastcam-Z

NASA

This illustration shows the location of Mastcam-Z, a powerful camera to ride on NASA's Mars 2020 rover to observe the Martian surface like never before. Mastcam-Z is an an advanced camera system with panoramic and stereoscopic imaging capability with a zoom capability. Read the full story here.

NASA Mars 2020 SHERLOC

NASA

This NASA graphic depicts the SHERLOC instrument to ride on the agency's Mars 2020 rover. SHERLOC is a robotic arm-mounted tool to scan the Martian surface for organics and conduct detailed mineralogical studies. Read the full story here.

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