Harvest Moon 2022: September's full moon thrills stargazers around the world (photos)

Full Harvest Moon setting behind the Statue of Liberty through a telephoto lens
The full Harvest Moon sets behind the Statue of Liberty as the sun rises on September 10, 2022, in New York City. (Image credit: Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)
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Looking for a telescope to see the full Harvest Moon? We recommend the Celestron Astro Fi 102 (opens in new tab)as the top pick in our best beginner's telescope guide.   

The full moon of September lit up the night sky this weekend in a dazzling lunar sight enjoyed by skywatchers around the world. 

September's full moon peaked on Saturday (Sept. 10), but did appear fully illuminated to casual observers in the day before and after its lunar show. It also marked the Harvest Moon of 2022, since this full moon was closest to the September equinox on Sept. 22 that will mark the changing seasons on Earth. 

"Many cultures hold festivals connected with the Harvest Moon," NASA officials wrote on Twitter (opens in new tab). "For example, those celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival share mooncakes."

Getty photographers around the world snapped amazing views of the 2022 Harvest Moon, including images from New York City, Spain and Tokyo, Japan.

Nicholas Isabella, a photographer based in New York City, awoke extra early on Saturday to capture a stunning view of the Harvest Moon. 

"This morning's Harvest moon setting above the Statue of Liberty," Isabella on Twitter (opens in new tab) early Saturday while sharing a stunning photo. "It was worth waking up early for this."

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Veteran astrophotographer Andrew McCarthy of Florence, Arizona, expressed a similar sentiment, even if he had to battle rainy weather to observe the moon

"The brief moment the Harvest Moon revealed itself before it was obscured by clouds the rest of the night," McCarthy wrote on Instagram (opens in new tab), where he posts as cosmic_background (opens in new tab), on Saturday. "This full moon means a lot to me personally, so I’m glad I was able to capture it despite the heavy rains last night."

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In Seattle, photographer Sigma Sreedharan captured amazing views of the Harvest Moon rising behind the Washington city's iconic Space Needle. 

"Here's a time-lapse video of the full Harvest Moon rising next to the Space Needle in Seattle last night," Sreedharan wrote in one Twitter post (opens in new tab).

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Sreedharan said that smoke from wildfires created a sort of natural filter during her photo session that resulted in a stunning view of the moon directly behind the Space Needle. 

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In the United Kingdom, observers were ready at a different monument, Stonehenge, to capture the Harvest Moon overhead. 

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The sight was equally amazing in Graceville, Minnesota, where "Grandma With a Camera" Carol Bauer captured stunning views of the full moon rising over water and homes.

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In the U.K.'s Cleeve Hill, Gloucestershire, amateur astronomer and photographer Susan Snow watched as the Harvest Moon rose above the horizon, casting trees in silhouette on the way.

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With so many amazing views of the Harvest Moon this year, it's hard to pick a favorite. Here's a few more we found that were truly stunning.

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If you're looking for gear to spot the next full moon or planet sight, you can check out our guides for the best binoculars and the best telescopes to suit your needs. If you're hoping to snap an epic photo of the moon, our recommendations for the best cameras for astrophotography and best lenses for astrophotography can help you find what you need. You can also read our guide on how to photograph the moon with a camera for general tips.

Editor's Note: If you snap a photo of the Harvest Moon near Jupiter and Neptune and would like to share it with Space.com's readers, send your photo(s), comments, and your name and location to spacephotos@space.com (opens in new tab)

Email Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com (opens in new tab) or follow him @tariqjmalik (opens in new tab). Follow us @Spacedotcom (opens in new tab), Facebook (opens in new tab) and Instagram (opens in new tab).

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Tariq Malik
Editor-in-Chief

Tariq is the Editor-in-Chief of Space.com and joined the team in 2001, first as an intern and staff writer, and later as an editor. He covers human spaceflight, exploration and space science, as well as skywatching and entertainment. He became Space.com's Managing Editor in 2009 and Editor-in-Chief in 2019. Before joining Space.com, Tariq was a staff reporter for The Los Angeles Times covering education and city beats in La Habra, Fullerton and Huntington Beach. In October 2022, Tariq received the Harry Kolcum Award (opens in new tab) for excellence in space reporting from the National Space Club Florida Committee. He is also an Eagle Scout (yes, he has the Space Exploration merit badge) and went to Space Camp four times as a kid and a fifth time as an adult. He has journalism degrees from the University of Southern California and New York University. You can find Tariq at Space.com and as the co-host to the This Week In Space podcast (opens in new tab) with space historian Rod Pyle on the TWiT network (opens in new tab). To see his latest project, you can follow Tariq on Twitter @tariqjmalik (opens in new tab).