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Exoplanet Discovery: The 7 Earth-Sized Planets of TRAPPIST-1 in Pictures

Planet Orbits Around TRAPPIST-1

ESO/M. Gillon et al.

This diagram shows the orbits of seven planets around the cool red dwarf star, TRAPPIST-1. The shaded area shows the star's "habitable zone," where a planet could have the right surface temperature for liquid water. The dotted lines show alternative boundaries to the habitable zone based on different "theoretical assumptions," according to a statement from the European Southern Observatory.

Planetary Transit of TRAPPIST-1

ESO/M. Gillon et al.

This chart shows how the red dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 appears to grow slightly dimmer each time one of its seven known planets crosses in front of the star )as seen from Earth).

Triple Transit

ESO/M. Gillon et al.

This graph shows the star TRAPPIST-1 during a rare triple transit event. A planetary transit occurs when a planet passes between its parent star and the Earth, causing an apparent change in the star's brightness. In this case, three planets transited the star.

TRAPPIST-1 Brightness Profile

ESO/M. Gillon et al.

This diagram shows the brightness of the cool red dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 over 20 days. Dips in the brightness are caused by one or more planets orbiting in front of the star and briefly blocking its light.

TRAPPIST-1 Star v Sun

ESO

This artist's impression shows the size of Earth's sun compared to the cool red dwarf star TRAPPIST-1. Planets that orbit closer to the star than Mercury orbits the sun can still have surface temperatures cool enough to support liquid water.

TRAPPIST-1 Solar System Comparison

ESO/O. Furtak

This diagram compares the TRAPPIST-1 planet system with Earth's solar system. The size of Earth's sun is shown with regard to the red dwarf star, TRAPPIST-1. The position of the seven planets around TRAPPIST-1 are shown in relation to Mercury's orbit around the sun.

TRAPPIST-1 Size Comparison

ESO/O. Furtak

A size comparison of the TRAPPIST-1 system with the sun and the inner-most planets, as well as Jupiter and its largest moons.

TRAPPIST-1 and Galilean Moons

ESO/O. Furtak

This diagram compares the TRAPPIST-1 system to the orbits of some of Jupiter's largest moons.

A Distant View in TRAPPIST-1

ESO/M. Kornmesser/spaceengine.org

An artist's impression of what an observer might see standing on one of the more distant planets known to orbit the cool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1.

A View from TRAPPIST-1

ESO/M. Kornmesser/spaceengine.org

An artist's impression of what it might look like from the surface of a planet in the TRAPPIST-1 system.

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