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Flowing Water on Mars: The Discovery in Pictures

Salty Water Streaks on Mars

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Planetary scientists have determined that recurring slope lineae flowing downhill on Mars formed by the action of contemporary liquid water. See the discovery in this gallery. HERE:These dark, narrow, 100 meter-long streaks (called recurring slope lineae) are flowing downhill on Mars, and are inferred to have been formed by contemporary flowing water. Recently, planetary scientists detected hydrated salts on these slopes at Hale crater, corroborating their original hypothesis that the streaks are indeed formed by liquid water. The blue color seen upslope of the dark streaks are thought not to be related to their formation, but instead are from the presence of the mineral pyroxene. [See full story.]

Slope Lineae at Garni Crater on Mars

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Dark narrow streaks called recurring slope lineae emanate from the walls of Garni crater on Mars. The dark streaks here stretch up to few hundred meters in length. Researchers hypothesize that they formed from the flow of briny liquid water on Mars. [See full story.]

Slope Lineae in Coprates Chasma on Mars

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Dark narrow streaks called recurring slope lineae flow down the west facing slopes of Coprates Chasma in the equatorial region of Mars. Researchers have inferred that these dark streaks flowing downhill on warm Martian slopes formed from the action of contemporary flowing liquid water on Mars. Discovery of hydrated salts in these slopes corroborate the liquid water hypotheses. [See full story.]

Slope Lineae at Horowitz Crater on Mars #1

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Researchers have inferred that these dark, narrow, 330 foot-long (100 m.) streaks called recurring slope lineae flowing downhill on Mars have formed by the action of contemporary flowing water. Recently, planetary scientists found hydrated salts on these slopes at Horowitz crater, corroborating the original hypothesis that the streaks form with liquid water. [See full story.]

Slope Lineae at Horowitz Crater on Mars #2

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Researchers have inferred that these dark, narrow, 330 foot-long (100 m.) streaks called recurring slope lineae flowing downhill on Mars have formed by the action of contemporary flowing water. Recently, planetary scientists found hydrated salts on these slopes at Horowitz crater, corroborating the original hypothesis that the streaks form with liquid water. [See full story.]

Slope Lineae at Horowitz Crater on Mars #3

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Researchers have inferred that these dark, narrow, 330 foot-long (100 m.) streaks called recurring slope lineae flowing downhill on Mars have formed by the action of contemporary flowing water. Recently, planetary scientists found hydrated salts on these slopes at Horowitz crater, corroborating the original hypothesis that the streaks form with liquid water. [See full story.]

Recurring Slope Lineae in Coprates Chasma

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Recurring slope lineae (RSL), the dark flows seen here, occur abundantly along the steep slopes of ancient bedrock in Coprates Chasma on Mars. Image released Feb. 19, 2014.

Southeast Rim of Hale Crater

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Hale Crater on Mars stretches about 90 miles (150 km) in diameter and lies in the mid-southern latitudes just north of the massive Argyre basin. This high resolution observation might help researchers see if recurring slope lineae (RSL) occur here. Image released Jan. 15, 2015.

Slope Features on Wall in Newton Crater

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

This enhanced-color image has undergone reprojection to show a view of the recurring slope lineae-covered slope as a viewer in a helicopter inside the crater might see. The image also includes a synthetic Mars-like sky. Image released August 4, 2011.

Slope Monitoring in Aram Chaos

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

A previous image showed some striking dark downslope flows in Aram Chaos on Mars. Images like this one will help researchers learn if these streaks are recurring slope lineae (RSL). Image released April 22, 2015.

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