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The Cosmic Art of Edward Belbruno (Gallery)

The Doorway

Space.com

Edward Belbruno is a scientist and mathematician, and has worked on problems involving orbital paths for space probes. He is also an artist, and a selection of his paintings are currently on display at the New York Institute of Technology Gallery 61. See some of Belbruno's work in this Space.com gallery. Here: Belbruno's "The Doorway," a fitting entry to his art portfolio.

Note:Meet Belbruno on Oct. 22 in New York at a Space.com gallery showing highlighting his work. Belbruno's art is available exclusively in the Space.com store.

Edward Belbruno, Artist and Scientist

Aggie Sung

Edward Belbruno is a research collaborator at the department of astrophysical science at Princeton University and director of the research company Innovative Orbital Design. Since 1970, his artwork has been displayed in galleries in the US and Europe.

When I Was 7 Edward Belbruno

Space.com

"When I Was 7" (1957) by Edward Belbruno, serves as an early indicator of the two things that would occupy most of Belbruno's life: art and space.

Diophantine Flow

Edward Belbruno

"Diophantine Flow" (2010) is one of scientist Edward Belbruno's works that reflects back to a pastel work he did in 1986 that helped him come up with a new way for spacecraft to slow down in space without using fuel.

Time Edward Belbruno

Edward Belbruno

"Time" (2009). While science inspired some of Belbruno's works, many stand alone as abstract expressionist works. His work has been shown in galleries in the United States and Europe, starting in 1970.

Universal Dance Edward BelBruno

Edward Belbruno

"Universal Dance" (2011) is part of a series of highly colorful pieces that reference the chaotic paths of space probes traveling among planets and other cosmic bodies.

Untitled Edward Belbruno

Edward Belbruno

"Untitled," (2014). Belbruno's most recent work demonstrates a departure from his previously colorful style.

Calla Cofield
Calla Cofield joined the crew of Space.com in October, 2014. She enjoys writing about black holes, exploding stars, ripples in space-time, science in comic books, and all the mysteries of the cosmos. She has been underground at three of the largest particle accelerators in the world. She'd really like to know what the heck dark matter is. Prior to joining Space.com Calla worked as a freelance science writer. Her work has appeared in APS News, Symmetry magazine, Scientific American, Nature News, Physics World, and others. From 2010 to 2014 she was a producer for The Physics Central Podcast. Previously, Calla worked at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City (hands down the best office building ever) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in California. Calla studied physics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and is originally from Sandy, Utah. Contact Calla via: E-Mail – Twitter

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