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Amazing Aurora Photos from the Great Solar Storm of 1989 (Gallery)

Aurora of March 13, 1989, from Sea Cliff, NY

©1989 Ken Spencer

Photograph of the aurora of March 13, 1989, taken from Sea Cliff, NY, by Ken Spencer. The view is looking roughly northeast.

Aurora of March 13, 1989, from Sea Cliff, NY #2

©1989 Ken Spencer

Photograph of the aurora of March 13, 1989, taken from Sea Cliff, NY, by Ken Spencer. The view is looking roughly northeast.

Aurora of March 13, 1989, from Sea Cliff, NY #3

©1989 Ken Spencer

Photograph of the aurora of March 13, 1989, taken from Sea Cliff, NY, by Ken Spencer. The view is looking roughly northeast.

Aurora of March 13, 1989, from Sea Cliff, NY #4

©1989 Ken Spencer

Photograph of the aurora of March 13, 1989, taken from Sea Cliff, NY, by Ken Spencer. The view is looking roughly northeast.

Aurora of March 13, 1989, from Sea Cliff, NY #5

©1989 Ken Spencer

Photograph of the aurora of March 13, 1989, taken from Sea Cliff, NY, by Ken Spencer. The view is looking roughly northeast.

Anatomy of Sun Storms & Solar Flares (Infographic)

Karl Tate/SPACE.com

See how solar flares, sun storms and huge eruptions from the sun work in this SPACE.com infographic. View the full solar storm infographic here.

Guide to the Auroras (Infographic) Alternate

Karl Tate, SPACE.com Contributor

The northern lights are more formally known as auroras, and are caused by interactions between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetic field. See how the northern lights work in this Space.com infographic.

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