SPECIAL REPORT
Ares 1-X

Mission: Ares 1 X

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HIGHLIGHTS
Friday, September 10
Ares I First Stage Engine Test
ATK test fires Ares I 1st stage at 3 pm ET in Promontary, Utah.
Wednesday, October 20
Ares I-X Rollout
The Ares I-X rocket to roll out to Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center.
Saturday, October 23
Ares I-X Launch Readiness
NASA to discuss the launch readiness of its Ares I-X mission in a briefing to begin no earlier than 5 pm ET.
Sunday, October 24
Ares I-X Status Update
A mission status update for NASA's Ares I-X launch set for Oct. 27. Update begins at 10 am ET.
Monday, October 25
Ares I-X Status Update
NASA to give a morning status update on the Ares I-X test launch at 10 am ET on NASA TV.
Tuesday, October 26
Ares I-X Prelaunch Briefing
NASA to hold a prelaunch briefing at 1 pm ET for the Ares I-X test launch on Oct. 27.
Wednesday, October 27
Ares I-X Launch from KSC
Launch of the Ares I-X mission from the Kennedy Space Center, Fla. (Launch window runs 8 am to 12 pm ET).
UPDATES
Ares I-X Test Flight a Success, NASA Says
28 October 2010, 02:37 PM EDT
NASA is calling its Ares I-X test launch today a success after a day of delay due to weather. The rocket blasted off at 11:30 a.m. EDT (1530 GMT), with its solid rocket motor first stage separating as planned from a dummy upper stage two minutes later. The first stage has splashed down under parachutes in the Atlantic Ocean. A recovery ship will retrieve it to be returned to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center spaceport. The dummy upper stage crashed into the ocean and sank, as planned. Click here for the full story from SPACE.com reporter Clara Moskowitz at the Kennedy Space Center.
SEPARATION! Ares I-X First Stage Separates as Planned
28 October 2010, 09:22 AM EDT
The Ares I-X rocket’s first stage, a giant solid rocket motor, has separated as planned about 26 miles above Earth. The first stage will parachute back to Earth, while the dummy second stage, Orion crew capsule and abort tower will continue on a parabolic trajectory to a height of 28 miles before crashing into the ocean. Watch it LIVE on NASA TV. Click here to read the launch preview story. Click here for SPACE.com’s NASA TV feed.
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