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How will Ukraine keep SpaceX's Starlink internet service online?

An artist's illustration of SpaceX's Starlink internet satellites in orbit. SpaceX has sent additional Starlink support to Ukraine as Russia's invasion destroys infrastructure and disrupts internet connectivity.
An artist's illustration of SpaceX's Starlink internet satellites in orbit. SpaceX has sent additional Starlink support to Ukraine as Russia's invasion destroys infrastructure and disrupts internet connectivity. (Image credit: SpaceX)

SpaceX's Starlink internet is now active in Ukraine. But will the company be able to keep it online? 

Russia's attacks on Ukraine continue to take lives and destroy infrastructure as the country invades. This infrastructure damage has disrupted internet access in Ukraine, leading a government official to publicly request Starlink satellite internet access for the country from SpaceX CEO Elon Musk. Musk obliged, activating Starlink service in Ukraine and sending additional hardware. But with continued attacks on infrastructure, how will Ukraine stay connected? 

"@elonmusk @SpaceX @SpaceXStarlink many thx! Starlink keeps our cities connected and emergency services saving lives! With Russian attacks on our infra, we need generators to keep Starlinks & life-saving services online — ideas?" Mykhailo Fedorov, Ukraine's vice prime minister and the country's minister of digital transformation, who made the original request of Musk, asked on Twitter today (March 2).

Related: SpaceX Starlink satellite internet terminals arrive in Ukraine

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Fedorov brings up an important point: Even though Starlink operates without the need for traditional internet infrastructure, the Earth-bound hardware still needs power. And, as Russian attacks bombard the country, Ukraine's internet access will continue to be threatened. 

Fedorov's statement publicly reached out for help acquiring generators to keep Starlink online for Ukrainians. But Musk responded with an alternative suggestion.

"Solar panels + battery pack better than generator, as no heat signature or smoke & doesn't run out of fuel," Musk wrote in response on Twitter

Mykhailo Fedorov, Ukraine's vice prime minister and the country's minister of digital transformation, shared this photo on Feb. 28, 2022 of Starlink internet terminals arrived in Ukraine after Russia invaded. (Image credit: Mykhailo Fedorov/Twitter)

Fedorov's concern also points to the importance of internet access for the country under attack.

Internet connection enables what Fedorov described as "life-saving" communication, whether that be among family members displaced and separated by a missile attack or first aid teams trying to locate an injured person. Internet access is a critical component for those in Ukraine fighting to survive the invasion.

Editor's note: Fedorov replied to Musk later today, stating:

"Good point - should work even with Ukrainian winters! We will keep you posted as we roll out more Starlinks across the country. THANK YOU again for helping us out with @SpaceXStarlink - this will save a lot of lives."

Russian criticism

Dmitry Rogozin, the director-general of Russia's space agency Roscosmos, has been publicly outspoken on Twitter about the effects of the war on outer space relations. Most recently, Rogozin announced that Roscosmos would halt UK-based internet satellite company OneWeb's launch, planned for Friday (March 4) aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket, if the company and the UK government did not meet certain demands.

Now, Rogozin is speaking out about SpaceX's provision of Starlink service to Ukraine, according to a statement translated and shared by space enthusiast Katya Pavlushchenko.

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"When Russia implements its highest national interests on the territory of Ukraine, @elonmusk appears with his Starlink which was previously declared as purely civilian," Rogozin stated, both referring to the invasion as an implementation of national interests as well as referring to the country of Ukraine as a territory.

"I warned about it, but our "muskophiles" said — he is the light of the world [of] cosmonautics. Here, look, he has chosen the side. I don't even blame him personally. This is the West that we should never trust," Rogozin added.

Email Chelsea Gohd at cgohd@space.com or follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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Chelsea “Foxanne” Gohd joined Space.com in 2018 and is now a Senior Writer, writing about everything from climate change to planetary science and human spaceflight in both articles and on-camera in videos. With a degree in Public Health and biological sciences, Chelsea has written and worked for institutions including the American Museum of Natural History, Scientific American, Discover Magazine Blog, Astronomy Magazine and Live Science. When not writing, editing or filming something space-y, Chelsea "Foxanne" Gohd is writing music and performing as Foxanne, even launching a song to space in 2021 with Inspiration4. You can follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd and @foxannemusic.