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Astronauts in space are beaming positivity to the people of Earth. (Amazing photos, too.)

NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan on the International Space Station shared this stunning image of Earth from space along with an inspirational message for a world gripped by the coronavirus pandemic. (Image credit: @AstroDrewMorgan/Twitter)

Astronauts at the International Space Station are sharing positivity and stunning images of our home planet from their temporary home in orbit as the world grapples with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Yesterday (March 26), NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan shared a hopeful sentiment from the International Space Station on Twitter. Alongside a stunning image of the Earth, with a piece of the space station in view, he wrote: "Even during our toughest times, we live on a beautiful planet. Stay strong planet Earth, we're in this together. #SpaceStation4all."

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But Morgan isn't the only astronaut using this unique vantage point to take awe-inspiring images that remind us back here on Earth of just how incredible our home really is. 

NASA astronaut Jessica Meir, who is also on board the space station, has been snapping unbelievable images of our planet. When sharing these images, she's been using the hashtag #EarthStrong, which other astronauts have also adopted to share their unique perspectives and connect.

This image below, which Meir shared on March 25, shows Earth juxtaposed against the brilliant, star-filled night sky. "Is it day or is it night? #NoFilter here, while taking photos of the night sky a few weeks ago, the Moon was so bright it lit up the Earth below. Goodnight Earth, let there be light! #GoodnightFromSpace #EarthStrong," she wrote on Twitter

A day earlier, on March 24, she shared an image of the United Kingdom, Ireland and part of Europe from space. The image, taken at night, shows all of the lights lit up in the towns and cities below. 

"Pretty rare to see the #UK, #Ireland, and (a bit of) #Europe in a single shot without a cloud in the sky ... hopefully a sign of better times ahead for all. Goodnight to my family and friends across the pond! #GoodnightFromSpace #EarthStrong," Meir wrote, seemingly implying that she is seeing changes in how Earth looks as people around the world self-isolate and travel, using less fossil fuels. Earth-orbiting satellites have so far observed significant changes in nitrogen-dioxide emissions over places including Italy and China.  

Meir shared another particularly stunning snapshot earlier that same day (March 24). She tweeted a swirling image of landforms in Algeria, which, from space, almost look like a painting. "Cause one day of Algerian #EarthArt is never enough ... so much going on down there, open for discussion to sage geologists! #EarthStrong #STEM," Meir shared

On March 23, Meir shared another striking, colorful image of Algeria that looks like it could either be a photo of Earth or a profound painting.

"Sending positive Monday vibes to Mother Earth and all of her inhabitants. She still looks equally as stunning from up here on @Space_Station. Check out #Algeria, looking like a cross section of a quartz crystal. #EarthArt #EarthStrong," Meir said. 

These are just a few of the breathtaking images that Meir and others have taken and continue to take and share of Earth from space. These photographs serve as a beautiful reminder that, while humans face incredible challenges here on Earth, our planet is a precious, fragile and magnificent thing. 

Follow Chelsea Gohd on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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