Skip to main content

Vote Now! Best Space Stories of the Week - April 28, 2013

Einstein's Gravity Theory , New Private Rocket & More

European Southern Observatory/J. Antoniadis (MPIfR)

Last week Antares launched into orbit, scientists confirmed Einstein's general theory of relativity in a previously untested way, and Eileen Collins, the first woman to pilot and command the space shuttle, entered the ranks of the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame. See the top stories of the last week here.

FIRST STOP: New Private Rocket Launches Into Orbit On Maiden Voyage

New Private Rocket Launches Into Orbit On Maiden Voyage

NASA/Bill Ingalls

A private Antares rocket built by Virginia’s Orbital Sciences Corp. is expected to launch into the afternoon sky at 5 p.m. ET today (April 17) from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility. It is the first test flight of the Antares rocket. [Full Story]

NEXT: Space Archaeologists Call for Preserving Off-Earth Artifacts

Space Archaeologists Call for Preserving Off-Earth Artifacts

NASA

That may well mean preserving the Apollo landing sites on the moon as national historic landmarks, hold dear space junk, or recognizing that far flung space robots are mobile artifacts of culture.[Full Story]

NEXT: Want to Live on Mars? Private Martian Colony Project Seeks Astronauts

Want to Live on Mars? Private Martian Colony Project Seeks Astronauts

Mars One/Bryan Versteeg

If a one-way trip to Mars appeals to you, now's the time to apply to be part of the first crew of a Red Planet colony. [Full Story]

NEXT: Astronaut Hall of Fame Adds 1st Female Shuttle Commander, Two Others

Astronaut Hall of Fame Adds 1st Female Shuttle Commander, Two Others

collectSPACE.com/Robert Z. Pearlman

Eileen Collins, the first woman to pilot and command the space shuttle, entered the ranks of the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame wearing the same two-piece blue suit that she wore to her astronaut selection interview nearly 25 years ago. [Full Story]

NEXT: NASA Must Pay for Plutonium Production to Fuel Deep-Space Probes

NASA Must Pay for Plutonium Production to Fuel Deep-Space Probes

NASA

NASA will have to start paying the full tab for the Department of Energy’s production of plutonium-238 spacecraft fuel starting next year, according to the White House’s federal budget request.[Full Story]

NEXT: Life on Mars? Finding It May Require Humans on Red Planet

Life on Mars? Finding It May Require Humans on Red Planet

Mars One / Bryan Versteeg

Life may well lurk beneath the Martian surface today, but it'll be tough to detect without sending humans to the Red Planet, some experts say. [Full Story]

NEXT: Private 'Grasshopper' Rocket Prototype Makes Highest Flight Yet

Private 'Grasshopper' Rocket Prototype Makes Highest Flight Yet

SpaceX

A private experimental rocket designed to lay the foundation for a fully reusable launch system has flown higher than ever before, soaring 80 stories into the air before landing softly back at its pad.[Full Story]

NEXT: Hubble Telescope Looks to the Future After 23 Years in Space

Hubble Telescope Looks to the Future After 23 Years in Space

NASA

NASA’s iconic Hubble Space Telescope celebrates its 23rd year in space today. How much longer can it keep observing the heavens, and what are NASA’s plans for its future?[Full Story]

NEXT: Saturn's Rings Bombarded by Space Rocks

Saturn's Rings Bombarded by Space Rocks

NASA/Cornell

Dusty clouds in Saturn’s rings seen by the Cassini spacecraft were actually caused by the breakup of a small piece of comet or asteroid that impacted the planet’s distinctive rings.[Full Story]

NEXT: Einstein's Gravity Theory Passes Toughest Test Yet

Einstein's Gravity Theory Passes Toughest Test Yet

European Southern Observatory/J. Antoniadis (MPIfR)

Scientists have confirmed Einstein's general theory of relativity in a previously untested way – by using a massive neutron star in orbit around a partner.[Full Story]

NEXT: Russian Cargo Spacecraft Successfully Docks to Space Station

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.