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Tiny Satellites Launch From Space Station (Photos)

Tiny Cubesat Satellites

NASA

Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module's robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012.

Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD)

NASA

Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Japanese module's robotic arm is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. Several tiny satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using the SSOD on Oct. 4, 2012.

Tiny Cubesat Satellites Over Earth

NASA

The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module's robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012.

Tiny Cubesat Satellites Deployment

NASA

Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station on Oct. 4, 2012.

Diagram of JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The Cubesat mission expands and introduces new utilization of the JEM using JEMRMS and JEM AL, which are unique features of the JEM module. The main purpose of this mission is to establish processes and procedures for satellite verifications, integration of the satellites, launching satellites to ISS, and deploying satellites into the space.

Lab Tech Works on NASA's TechEdSat

NASA

A laboratory technician does some very precise measurements on the tiny satellite. The image was released Oct. 4, 2012.

NASA's TechEdSat Launches from International Space Station

NASA

TechEdSat measures only 10 centimeters across and cost less than $30,000. This image was released on Oct. 4, 2012.

Small Satellite Orbital Deployer

JAXA

A Small Satellite Orbital Deployer is to be used from Japan's Kibo module to deploy a set of cubesats.

Cubesat Flashes in Space

FIT

Cubesat flashes should be observable by the unaided eye or with small binoculars.

Flashing FITSAT-1 Cubesat

FIT

Flashing FITSAT-1 was built by Japan’s Fukuoka Institute of Technology.

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