Skip to main content

Next Stop, Jupiter! Launch Photos of NASA's Juno Mission

Juno and Lightning Towers

Patrick H. Corkery/United Launch Alliance

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket blasts off carrying NASA's Juno mission at Kennedy Space Center, on August 5, 2011. Four lightning protection towers surround the rocket.

Juno Lights Up Its Engines

Patrick H. Corkery/United Launch Alliance

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket blasts off carrying NASA's Juno mission at Kennedy Space Center, on August 5, 2011. The launch marks the second of five launches for NASA in 2011.

Atlas V Rocket Launches with Juno Spacecraft

NASA/Bill Ingalls

An Atlas V rocket launches with the Juno spacecraft payload from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Friday, August 5, 2011. The Juno spacecraft will make a five-year, 400-million-mile voyage to Jupiter, orbit the planet, investigate its origin and evolution with eight instruments to probe its internal structure and gravity field, measure water and ammonia in its atmosphere, map its powerful magnetic field and observe its intense auroras.

Atlas 5 Carrying Juno Spacecraft Seconds After Liftoff

Pat Corkery/United Launch Alliance

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 12:25 p.m. EDT with the Juno spacecraft for NASA. The launch of the Juno mission marks the second of five NASA missions scheduled to launch this year on ULA vehicles within a six month timeframe. Juno will improve our understanding of our solar system’s beginnings by revealing the origin and evolution of Jupiter. After a five-year journey, Juno will spend a year and 33 orbits studying many scientific aspects of the largest planet in our solar system.

Atlas 5 Carrying Juno Rises on Column of Exhaust

NASA/Bill Ingalls

An Atlas V rocket launches with the Juno spacecraft payload from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Friday, August 5, 2011. The Juno spacecraft will make a five-year, 400-million-mile voyage to Jupiter, orbit the planet, investigate its origin and evolution with eight instruments to probe its internal structure and gravity field, measure water and ammonia in its atmosphere, map its powerful magnetic field and observe its intense auroras.

Juno Launch as Seen by Astronaut Nicole Stott

Nicole Stott (via Twitter as @Astro_Nicole)

Astronaut Nicole Stott caught Juno's launch on August 5, 2011. She tweeted the picture with this comment: "Our view of Juno launch from Cocoa Beach. Next stop Jupiter! Beautiful!"

Atlas 5 Carrying Juno Just Begins to Lift Off

NASA/Bill Ingalls

An Atlas V rocket launches with the Juno spacecraft payload from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Friday, August 5, 2011. The Juno spacecraft will make a five-year, 400-million-mile voyage to Jupiter, orbit the planet, investigate its origin and evolution with eight instruments to probe its internal structure and gravity field, measure water and ammonia in its atmosphere, map its powerful magnetic field and observe its intense auroras.

Juno Rocket Solid Rocket Booster Separation

NASA TV

Two solid rocket boosters can be seen separating from the Atlas 5 rocket carrying NASA Juno spacecraft to orbit Aug. 5, 2011.

Juno Spacecraft Telemetry Data

NASA TV

Telemetry data from NASA's Juno launch shows an illustration of the spacecraft attached to its Centaur upper stage rocket after liftoff on Aug. 5, 2011.

Juno Launches

NASA TV

Juno spacecraft launches aboard the Atlas 5 launch vehicle at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, 12:25 EDT, August 5, 2011.

Juno Launches Through Blue Sky

NASA TV

Juno spacecraft launches aboard the Atlas 5 launch vehicle at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, 12:25 EDT, August 5, 2011.

Have a news tip, correction or comment? Let us know at community@space.com.