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Live Science launches the 'Life's Little Mysteries' podcast! Get ready for far-out science questions (and answers)

(Image credit: Future)

Hey, space fans! 

We may love space at Space.com, but that doesn't mean that we don't love all the other realms of science, too. In fact, we depend on our friends at Live Science to keep us posted on the latest and greatest discoveries across the science realm. Why DO we have fingerprints anyway? And what might happen if Earth's magnetic field just disappeared? Well, Live Science has you covered in the new "Life's Little Mysteries" podcast

Starring Live Science senior writer Mindy Weisberger and editor-in-chief Jeanna Bryner, the new podcast will answer your questions about science mysteries big and small. They'll tackle ancient civilizations; our planet Earth and the solar system; the creatures and technologies that surround us; and even our own bodies.

You can even submit your own questions on Live Science Forums

In the first episode, Mindy and Jeanna dive deep into Earth's ocean (figuratively) to answer that burning question: How much of the ocean is whale pee? (Yuck.) They'll also tackle some serious mysteries, like why our oceans are salty and could they ever boil away? (We hope not.) 

Check out the Life's Little Mysteries podcast Apple podcasts, Spotify and Audioboom.

We hope you enjoy!

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.

Tariq Malik

SPACE.COM EDITOR IN CHIEF — Tariq joined the Space.com team in 2001 as a staff writer, and later editor, covering human spaceflight, exploration and space science. He became Space.com's Managing Editor in 2009. Before joining Space.com, Tariq was a staff reporter for The Los Angeles Times. He is also an Eagle Scout (yes, he has the Space Exploration merit badge) and went to Space Camp four times as a kid and a fifth time as an adult. He has journalism degrees from the University of Southern California and New York University. To see his latest project, you can follow Tariq on Google+, Twitter and on Facebook.