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Chinese astronauts to deliver live science lesson from space station Thursday. Watch it live.

China's Shenzhou 13 astronauts are all set to present a science lesson live from the orbiting Tiangong space station on Thursday.

Astronauts Zhai Zhigang, Wang Yaping and Ye Guangfu will begin the class at 2:40 am EST (0740 GMT, 3:40 pm Beijing time) on Thursday (Dec. 9) from inside the Tianhe module, the core (and currently only module) of the Tiangong station. You can watch the live science lesson (in Mandarin) in the window above, courtesy of China's CCTV news outlet (opens in new tab). on YouTube.

 Related: The latest news about China's space program 

Chinese astronaut Wang Yaping inside the Tianhe module for China's Tiangong space station. (Image credit: CNSA)

The class will feature topics including life and work aboard the Tianhe space station module, the behavior of biological cells, how astronauts move in microgravity, water surface tension experiments and more, according to CMSA (opens in new tab), China's human spaceflight agency.

The lesson will be part of a series known as "Tiangong Class," taking the name for the Chinese space station (meaning "heavenly palace"), as China looks to utilize its new orbital outpost for inspiring interest in space and science domestically and for international prestige.

Wang Yaping, on her first trip to space in 2013, delivered a science class to 60 million school children while aboard the Tiangong 1 space lab.

Thursday’s class will be streamed live by Chinese media, and will also likely be streamed by the English language CGTN Youtube channel (opens in new tab)

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Andrew is a freelance space journalist with a focus on reporting on China's rapidly growing space sector. He began writing for Space.com in 2019 and writes for SpaceNews, IEEE Spectrum, National Geographic, Sky & Telescope, New Scientist and others. Andrew first caught the space bug when, as a youngster, he saw Voyager images of other worlds in our solar system for the first time. Away from space, Andrew enjoys trail running in the forests of Finland. You can follow him on Twitter @AJ_FI (opens in new tab).