New Star Explosion: Photos of Nova Delphinus 2013 (Gallery)

Nova Delphini 2013 Confirmed

G. Masi, P. Schmeer and F. Nocentini/The Virtual Telescope Project 2.0

New star explosion Nova Delphini 2013 is seen in the Delphinus constellation (the Dolphin). This photo is by astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope project. The nova was discovered by Japanese astronomer Koichi Itagaki of Yamagata, Japan. Image released August 14, 2013. [Read the Full Story]

Nova Delphini 2013: Wide Field Star Chart

G. Masi, P. Schmeer and F. Nocentini/The Virtual Telescope Project 2.0

The location of the star explosion Nova Delphini 2013 is seen in the Delphinus constellation (the Dolphin). This photo is by astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope project. The nova was discovered by Japanese astronomer Koichi Itagaki of Yamagata, Japan. Image released August 14, 2013. [Read the Full Story]

Nova Delphini 2013: Deeper Star Chart

G. Masi, P. Schmeer and F. Nocentini/The Virtual Telescope Project 2.0

The location of the star explosion Nova Delphini 2013 is seen in the Delphinus constellation (the Dolphin). This photo is by astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope project. The nova was discovered by Japanese astronomer Koichi Itagaki of Yamagata, Japan. Image released August 14, 2013. [Read the Full Story]

PNV J20233073+2046041: A Spectrum (Aug. 14, 2013)

G. Masi, P. Schmeer and F. Nocentini/The Virtual Telescope Project 2.0

A spectrum of Nova Delphini 20013, taken under less than ideal conditions with the Celestron C14 robotic unit, shows an evident emission at the H-alpha wavelength. Spectrum captured August 14, 2013. [Read the Full Story]

PNVJ20233073+2046041: 14 Aug. 2013

G. Masi, P. Schmeer and F. Nocentini/The Virtual Telescope Project 2.0

A later, better spectrum was captured for Nova Delphinius 2013, showing the H-beta emission more clearly. This object was officially classified as a nova on CBET 3628, when the nature of the nova was unveiled by this spectroscopy. Spectrum captured August 13, 2013. [Read the Full Story]

Nova PNV J20233073+2046041 Photographed by John Chumack

Astrophotographer John Chumack sent in a photo of the new nova in Delphinus, taken August 14, 2013, from his observatory in Yellow Springs, Ohio. He writes: "New nova in Delphinus [is] visible in binoculars. Hard to see [with the] naked eye unless you are in a very dark sky and know exactly where to look, but this is a very bright nova. Most don’t get above 8th magnitude…. It was at magnitude 6.3 at discovery less than 24 hours ago. I captured it surging at mag. 6.1 last night. According to reports around the world, [it] is still brightening and is now brighter than 6.0th magnitude."

Nova Delphinus 2013 Seen in Germany

Daniel Fischer

Astrophotographer Daniel Fischer caught Nova Delphinus 2013 in this photo (marked with green arrow at top right). He took the photo at 21:45 UTC on August 14 from Königswinter, Germany.

New Star Explosion Brightens on August 15, 2013

Daniel Fischer

Astrophotographer Daniel Fischer caught Nova Delphinus 2013 (marked with green arrow at top) a second time in this photo. He took the photo from Königswinter, Germany. He tweeted at about 9 pm UTC on August 15, 2013: "Here is Nova Delphini 2013 a few minutes ago - indeed significantly brighter than yesterday. Still not dark here ... pic.twitter.com/kYdMR03PRD"

Nova Delphinus 2013 Seen in South Australia

Astrophotographer Ian Musgrave obtained this image of Nova Delphinus 2013 (see headless arrow) on August 16, 2013, from his backyard in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Nova Delphinus 2013 Seen in South Australia #2

Astrophotographer Ian Musgrave obtained this image of Nova Delphinus 2013 (marked) on August 16, 2013, from his backyard in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Nova Delphinus 2013 Photographed by Doug Klotz

Doug Klotz

Photographer Doug Klotz sent in a photo of Nova Delphinus 2013, taken on August 16 from an unknown location. He writes: "I just happened to have taken an image of that part of the sky on 8/13 while photographing the Perseids. Went out tonight and took another image and there it is! It seems to be at least as bright as Zeta Delphini which is mag 4.6. Seems to be brightening!"

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