Gallery: Armadillo Aerospace Builds Rockets in Texas

John Carmack of Armadillo Aerospace

Armadillo Aerospace

Video game developer John Carmack and his firm Armadillo Aerospace are developing vertical launch vehicles.

Vertical Launches

Armadillo Aerospace

Armadillo Aerospace, a leading developer of reusable rocket-powered vehicles, plans to build suborbital rocketships for space tourists that launch vertically.

Armadillo's Dalek Spacecraft

Armadillo

Test shot of Dalek, under development by Armadillo Aerospace of Rockwall, Texas, lifting off from New Mexico’s Spaceport America.

Test Flight

Armadillo Aerospace

An Armadillo Aerospace rocket launches skyward in a Jan. 28, 2012 test flight from New Mexico’s Spaceport America.

Armadillo's Balloon-parachute Recovery System

Armadillo Aerospace

A balloon-parachute recovery system was deployed during a Jan. 28, 2012 flight of an Armadillo Aerospace rocket.

Earth as Seen by an Armadillo Aerospace Rocket

Armadillo Aerospace

View of the Rio Grande River valley from 239,000 ft (~50 mi) aboard Armadillo Aerospace’s STIG-A 3 rocket launched from Spaceport America, taken January 28, 2012.

Space Race 2012 - Spaceship Concept

Space Adventures/Space Race 2012

An artist's depiction of a suborbital spaceflight offered by Space Adventures aboard an Armadillo Aerospace Vehicle. Seattle's Space Needle is offering a free trip on the spaceship as part of its Space Race 2012 contest.

STIG A Rocket Blasts Off from Spaceport America

New Mexico Spaceport Authority

The STIG A rocket built by Armadillo Aerospace roars skyward from New Mexico’s Spaceport America on Dec. 4, 2011.

View of Earth by STIG A

New Mexico Spaceport Authority

View of Earth above Spaceport America from Armadillo Aerospace's STIG A rocket flight at apogee (highest point) on Dec. 4, 2011.

Mock Lunar Lander Success

Armadillo Aerospace successfully flies its Scorpius vehicle between two launch pads on Sept. 12, 2009 during a bid to win $1 million in NASAs Lunar Lander Challenge.

Rocket Restarts Engine In Flight, Lands Vertically

Armadillo Aerospace vehicle launches to 2000 ft; shuts down its engine; pops a drogue chute; relights its engine; and makes a pinpoint landing on its launch pad.

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