Photos: Jupiter, the Solar System's Largest Planet

Secrets of Jupiter's Great Red Spot Revealed in New Weather Map

ESO/NASA/JPL/ESA/L. Fletcher

New thermal images from ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) and other ground-based telescopes show swirls of warmer air and cooler regions never seen before within Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. The image on the left was obtained with the VISIR on the VLT in Chile on 18 May 2008. The image on the right was obtained by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope on 15 May 2008.

Flying NASA Telescope Snaps First Photos from Stratosphere

NASA/Anthony Wesley.

This image shows a comparison of Jupiter as seen in a visible light view taken by astronomer Anthony Wesley (left) and in infrared wavelengths used by NASA's SOFIA telescope during its "first light" flight on May 26, 2010. The infrared view was taken by the FORCAST camera on SOFIA. The white stripe in the infrared image is a region of relatively transparent clouds through which the warm interior of Jupiter can be seen. Full Story.

Giant Meteor Caused Jupiter Fireball, Scientists Say

NASA, ESA, M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley), H.B. Hammel (Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo.), A.A. Simon-Miller (Goddard Space Flight Center), and the Jupiter Impact Science Team

Detailed observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope have found that the flash of light seen June 3 on Jupiter came from a giant meteor burning up high above the planet's cloud tops. The space visitor did not plunge deep enough into the atmosphere to explode and leave behind any telltale cloud of debris, as seen in previous Jupiter collisions.

Jupiter's Missing Cloud Stripe Bounces Back Big Time

JPL, University of Oxford, UC Berkeley, Gemini Observatory, University of San Carlos, Philippines [Full Story]

This Nov. 18 Gemini North Telescope image of Jupiter combines blue, red and yellow images into a false-color composite that clearly shows the storm in the South Equatorial Belt. The belt is now turning dark after a brief fade to white.

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