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Samsung's 'SpaceSelfie' Balloon Crash-Lands on a Michigan Farm

Actor and model Cara Delevingne was the first to send her selfie into the stratosphere with Samsung's "SpaceSelfie" device, which crash-landed on a farm in Michigan this past weekend on Oct. 26.
Actor and model Cara Delevingne was the first to send her selfie into the stratosphere with Samsung's "SpaceSelfie" device, which crash-landed on a farm in Michigan this past weekend on Oct. 26. (Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung's outer space selfie (opens in new tab)device has crash-landed in Michigan. 

Last week, Samsung Europe launched the "SpaceSelfie," a device comprised of a high-altitude balloon and solar-powered machine which, according to a company statement, (opens in new tab)sent "the world's first selfie sent to space." The device launched into the stratosphere (opens in new tab), however, not to space. It reached about 22 miles (35 km) above Earth's surface, Hugh Lewis, an astrophysics professor at the University of Southampton, estimated to the BBC (opens in new tab)

But, while Samsung planned for the device to touch down back on Earth with the help of its balloon component after taking its first image, things didn't go as planned. After being subjected to inclement weather, the SpaceSelfie crashed down on the property of a woman in rural Michigan.

Related: Record-Breaking Supersonic Skydive from 'Near-Space' in Photos

Michigan resident Mumby-Welke and her husband heard a loud crash outside of their home in Gratiot County on Saturday morning (Oct. 26). They went outside to investigate and found the SpaceSelfie device on their property. 

“We realized it had fallen from the sky. It looked like a satellite," Mumby-Welke told NBC News (opens in new tab).

The couple noticed logos on the device from Samsung and Raven Industries - a company in South Dakota from which the SpaceSelfie launched This led her to an internet search, which revealed more information about the device.

"Early Saturday morning, Samsung Europe's SpaceSelfie balloon came back down to earth. During this planned descent of the balloon to land in the U.S., weather conditions resulted in an early soft landing in a selected rural area. No injuries occurred and the balloon was subsequently retrieved. We regret any inconvenience this may have caused," a Samsung spokesperson told Space.com in an email.

While it was still in the stratosphere, the SpaceSelfie device snapped an image of its "first selfie" of actor and model Cara Delevingne, which was displayed on a digital screen with "a unique view of planet earth as the backdrop," the company said. 

The company intends for Delevingne's selfie to be the "first of many that Samsung will lift into the stratosphere this month as part of SpaceSelfie, a mission to give everyone the chance to get their face in space." 

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Chelsea “Foxanne” Gohd joined Space.com in 2018 and is now a Senior Writer, writing about everything from climate change to planetary science and human spaceflight in both articles and on-camera in videos. With a degree in Public Health and biological sciences, Chelsea has written and worked for institutions including the American Museum of Natural History, Scientific American, Discover Magazine Blog, Astronomy Magazine and Live Science. When not writing, editing or filming something space-y, Chelsea "Foxanne" Gohd is writing music and performing as Foxanne, even launching a song to space in 2021 with Inspiration4. You can follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd and @foxannemusic.