Shuttle Endeavour's STS-127 Mission, Part 1

ShuttleHeat Shield Survey Under Way
16 July 2009
1:22p.m. EDT

Astronauts aboard theshuttle Endeavour are hard at work for today?s hours-long survey of the shuttleheat shield using a sensor-tipped inspection pole and robotic arm. They willscan the heat-resistant reinforced carbon-carbon panels lining Endeavour?sleading wing edges and nose cap to record damage from launch debris.

Clickhere for SPACE.com?slook at today?s work in space.

-- Tariq Malik

NASA will broadcast Endeavour?sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV. Clickhere for SPACE.com?sNASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left on this page.

 

Listen Shuttle Crew, Apollo 11 Launch Audio
16 July 2009
9:20a.m. EDT

You can listen to thereal-time audio of NASA?s historic Apollo 11 mission launch today by clicking here.Apollo 11 launched on July 16, 1969 to send three Americans to the moon. Themission made the first manned moon landing four days later.

Meanwhile, the Endeavourshuttle crew is working through its firstfull day in space after launching toward the International Space Station onWednesday. The astronauts will scan their heat shield for any damage fromlaunch debris using a sensor-tipped pole. Watch the mission live via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast. 

Clickhere for SPACE.com?slook at today?s work in space.

-- Tariq Malik

NASA will broadcast Endeavour?sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV. Clickhere for SPACE.com?sNASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left on this page.

 

Shuttle Astronauts Begin1st Full Day in Space
16 July 2009
9:00a.m. EDT

Astronauts aboard theshuttle Endeavour are tackling their firstfull day in space after launching toward the International Space Station onWednesday. They will scan their heat shield for any damage from launch debrisusing a sensor-tipped pole. Watch the mission live via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast. 

The seven astronauts onEndeavour awoke at 8:03 a.m. EDT (1103 GMT) to the tune ?These Are TheDays? by the band 10,000 Maniacs. The song was selected for mission specialistTim Kopra, who is beginning long-duration mission at the space station. Todayis Flight Day 2 of Endeavour?s 16-day STS-127 mission to the space station.

Clickhere forSPACE.com?s look at today?s work in space.

-- Tariq Malik

NASA will broadcast Endeavour?sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV. Clickhere for SPACE.com?sNASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left on this page.

 

Endeavour Engines ShutDown as Planned
15 July 2009
6:12p.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ? Therocket engines boosting Endeavour and its external tank towards orbit have shutdown as planned about eight and a half minutes into flight. Watch the missionlive via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast. 

The milestone, known asMain Engine Cut Off (MECO), and will be swiftly followed by thejettison of Endeavour?s external tank. The spacecraft is flying towards itsintended orbit. The next major milestone will be the opening of Endeavour?spayload bay at 7:28 p.m. EDT (2328 GMT). 

-- Clara Moskowitz

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV. Clickhere for SPACE.com?s NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upperleft on this page.

Solid Rocket BoostersSeparate
15 July 2009 6:06 p.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ? The twinsolid rocket boosters assisting Endeavour's launch into space have separated asplanned from the shuttle's external tank.  

The reusable boostersseparate about two minutes and five seconds after liftoff and fall back towardthe Atlantic Ocean, where they will land under parachutes and be retrieved byrecovery ships. They are equipped with cameras to record the performance ofEndeavour's external tank and any foam loss seen during today's ascent.

-- Clara Moskowitz

NASA will broadcast Endeavour?sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV. Clickhere for SPACE.com?s NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upperleft on this page.

Liftoff! ShuttleEndeavour Launches Spaceward
15 July 2009 6:03 p.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Thespace shuttle Endeavour has cleared the launch tower and gaining altitude afterlifting off at about 7:13 p.m. ES (2319 GMT).

Riding spaceward aboardEndeavour are STS-127 commander Mark Polansky, shuttle pilot DougHurley and mission specialists Chris Cassidy, Tom Marshburn, Dave Wolf, TimKopra - all of NASA - and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Julie Payette. Polansky,Payette and Wolf are veteran spaceflyers. The rest are rookie astronauts makingtheir first flight.

-- Clara Moskowitz

NASA will broadcast Endeavour?sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV. Clickhere for SPACE.com?s NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upperleft on this page.

Shuttle Endeavour 'Go for Launch'
15 July 2009 5:54 p.m. EDT

Shuttle Endeavour has been clearedfor launch from Kennedy Space Center's pad 39-A on its 23rd mission- the 127th space shuttle flight and the 29th shuttlemission to the International Space Station.

Thecountdown has just picked up following the planned T-9 minute hold as finallaunch preparations are rushed to completion.

Endeavour'spreferred launch time is 6:03:10 p.m. EDT (2203:10 GMT) ? near the midpoint ofa 10-minute launch window that closes at 6:08:10 p.m. EDT (2208:10 GMT).

Stormyweather near the Florida launch site has dissipated and is now observed 'Go' onall fronts with no constraints to launch.

Themission management team has been polled and all have reported 'Go for launch.'The seven STS-127 astronauts, led by veteran mission commander Mark Polanskyand pilot Doug Hurley, are strapped into their seats, runningthrough their pre-launch checklists and are closely monitoring spacecraft systemsfor their ascent to orbit.

Notechnical or vehicle issues are being worked at this time, with very littlechatter on the internal communication loops.

TheEastern Range is reporting 'Clear for launch.' The two Solid Rocket Boosterrecovery ships are on-station, about 140 northeast of Cape Canaveral andabout 7 miles away from the predicted impact point of the spent boosters.Conditions at the primary Trans-Oceanic Abort Landing (TAL) site in Moron,Spain are 'Green' or 'Go' for launch.

Overthe next nine minutes, the Orbiter's access arm will be retracted, thehydraulic power system (APU) started, the liquid hydrogen and oxygen tankspressurized, Endeavour's internal flight computers will take control of thecountdown and a booster steering test will be conducted. The three spaceshuttle main engines will ignite at T-minus 6.6 seconds and the twin solidrockets boosters will light at T-minus zero resulting in liftoff.

Allspacecraft systems are reported 'Go'. 9 minutes to launch.

-- Roger Guillemette

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TVduring launch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

WeatherCooperating, Endeavour Ready for Launch
15 July 2009 5:35 p.m. EDT

Thestorm clouds have cleared, shuttle Endeavour's hatch has been closed andlatched for flight, the seven STS-127 astronauts are strapped into their seatsand final preparations are progressing smoothly for thisevening's launch attempt from Kennedy Space Center's pad 39-A. This is thesixth attempt to launch Endeavour on mission STS-127. Watch the launch live viaSPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast.

Thecountdown clock is currently halted at the T-minus 9-minute mark ? a scheduledbuilt-in hold lasting approx. 45 minutes. Launch is scheduled for 6:03:10 p.m.EDT (2203:10 GMT) ? near the midpoint of a 10-minute launch window that closesat 6:08:10 p.m. EDT (2208:10 GMT).

Stormyweather conditions along Florida's Space Coast have been slowly dissipating ?Launch Weather Officer Kathy Winters has just upgraded the forecast to an80-percent probability of acceptable conditions for launch.

As thecountdown enters its final 30 minutes, the launch team is not currently workingany technical issues. Weather at two of the primary Trans-Oceanic Abort Landing(TAL) sites in Moron and Zaragoza, Spain is both observed and forecast 'Green'or 'Go' to support a launch attempt this evening.

Veteran of two shuttle missions,astronaut Mark Polansky is commander of STS-127 accompanied byrookie pilot Doug Hurley. STS-127 mission specialists are Christopher J.Cassidy, Thomas H. Marshburn, David A. Wolf and Canadian astronaut JuliePayette who also serves as Endeavour's flight engineer.

Endeavour will deliver astronautTimothy L. Kopra to the International Space Station as flight engineer andscience officer and return Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata to Earth.

Wolf is making his fourthspaceflight and previously spent 128 days aboard the Russian Mir space station;Payette is making her second spaceflight, having previously flown on missionSTS-99 in 1999. Hurley, Cassidy, Marshburn and Kopra are spaceflight rookies.

Theastronauts are running through their pre-launch checklists and are closelymonitoring their spacecraft systems in preparation for their ascent to orbit.The close-out crew has finished breaking down the 'White Room' access platformsurrounding the Orbiter's hatch and departed the launch pad.

At thetime of launch, the International Space Station will be orbiting about 220miles above the central Pacific Ocean.

The16-day STS-127 mission will include five spacewalks and the installation of twoplatforms outside of the Japanese Kibo module. One platform is permanent andwill serve as a type of porch for experiments that require direct exposure tospace. The other is an experiment storage pallet that will be detached andreturned with the shuttle. During the mission, Kibo?srobotic arm will exchange three experiments from the palette to the platform.Future experiments also can be transferred to the platform from the insideusing the laboratory?s airlock.

-- Roger Guillemette

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TVduring launch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

 

?Weather Improves, Countdown ProceedingSmoothly
15 July 2009 5:00 p.m. EDT

Thecountdown is proceeding smoothly for thisevening's launch attempt of shuttle Endeavour on a mission to theInternational Space Station; however, persistent stormy weather surroundingFlorida's Space Coast remains a concern for launch. Watch the launch live via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast.

Launchis scheduled for 6:03:10 p.m. EDT (2203:10 GMT) ? near the midpoint of a10-minute launch window that closes at 6:08:10 p.m. EDT (2208:10 GMT). A finaladjustment may be made at the T-9 minute hold to more precisely align with theorbit of the International Space Station.

Chiefastronaut Steve Lindsey is flying weather reconnaissance and landing approachesin the Shuttle Training Aircraft to monitor conditions around the Kennedy SpaceCenter. Forecasters remain concerned about the possible formation of showersand thunderstorms within 20 nautical miles of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Twoprevious launch attempts on Sunday and Monday were scrubbed due toweather-related launch safety violations.

Endeavour'shatch has been closed and latched for flight, the seven STS-127 astronauts arestrapped into their seats and final preparations are progressing for thisafternoon's launch attempt from Kennedy Space Center's Pad 39-A. The countdownclock has just restarted following the planned T-minus 20-minute hold and willtick down to T-minus 9-minute hold - a planned, built-in hold to allow thelaunch team to catch up on any final preparations.

Thelaunch team is not currently working any technical issues as the countdownenters its final hour. The close-out crew has broken down the 'white room'access platform that surrounds the Orbiter's hatch and has departed from thelaunch pad.

Endeavour is about to sail on its 23rdmission to deliver the final components of the Japan's Kibo laboratory to theISS. The lab will provide a type of "front porch" for experiments inthe exposed environment, and a robotic arm that will be attached to the KiboPressurized Module and used to position experiments outside the station.

?-- Roger Guillemette

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TVduring launch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

Endeavour'sHatch Secured for Launch
15 July 2009 3:55 p.m. EDT

ShuttleEndeavour's hatch has been closed and latched for flight, the seven STS-127 astronautsare strapped into their seats and final preparations are progressing smoothlyfor thisevening's launch attempt from pad 39A at Florida's Kennedy Space Center.Watch the launch live via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast.

Launchis scheduled for 6:03:10 p.m. EDT (2203:10 GMT) ? near the midpoint of a 10-minutelaunch window that closes at 6:08:10 p.m. EDT (2208:10 GMT). A final adjustmentmay be made at the T-9 minute hold to more precisely align with the orbit ofthe International Space Station.

TheSTS-127 crew - led by veteran mission commander Mark Polansky androokie pilot Doug Hurley - just completed the final series of air-to-groundcommunications checks to ensure that the astronauts can talk to flightcontrollers and each other during the spacecraft's ascent to orbit.

Endeavour'smassive External Tank is now filled with a half-million gallons ofsuper-chilled liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen and will continue to betopped-off until launch.

Thelaunch team is not working any technical issues at this time. Stormy weatherconditions along Florida's Space Coast, typical for mid-July, have persistedthroughout the countdown ? at this time, conditions are 'Red' or 'No Go' forlaunch due to cumulus and anvil clouds, lightning and field mills (electricallycharged atmospheric conditions).

Theofficial weather forecast remains unchanged at an optimistic 60 percentprobability of acceptable conditions for launch ? the primary concern isshowers and thunderstorms within 20 nautical miles of the Shuttle LandingFacility and the formation of a storm cell with anvil clouds that is slowlymigrating toward the space center from the northeast.

STS-127will be the 29th shuttle mission to the International Space Stationand the 16-day flight will include five spacewalks

-- Roger Guillemette

NASA will broadcast Endeavour'sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV duringlaunch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

EndeavourAstronauts Onboard for Launch
15 July 2009 3:25 p.m. EDT

CAPECANAVERAL, Fla. ? For the third time in four days, the seven STS-127 astronautsare now securely strapped into their seats onboard shuttle Endeavour and arebeginning final preparations for thisevening's launch attempt from Kennedy Space Center's Pad 39A. Watch thelaunch live via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast.

Launchis scheduled for 6:03:10 p.m. EDT (2203:10 GMT) ? near the midpoint of a10-minute launch window that closes at 6:08:10 p.m. EDT (2208:10 GMT).

Led by veteran commander Mark Polansky(making his third spaceflight) and rookie pilot Doug Hurley, the STS-127mission specialists are Christopher J. Cassidy, Thomas H. Marshburn, David A. Wolf and CanadianSpace Agency astronaut Julie Payette.

Endeavour will deliver astronautTimothy L. Koprato the International Space Station as flight engineer and science officer andreturn Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata to Earth.

Wolf is making his fourthspaceflight and previously spent 128 days aboard the Russian Mir space station;Payette is making her second spaceflight, having previously flown on mission STS-99in 1999, and will serve as Endeavour's flight engineer. Cassidy, Marshburn and Kopra will be makingtheir first trips to space. By virtue of his seat location on Endeavour's upperflight deck, Chris Cassidy will become the 500th human to fly intospace.

Theastronauts are now engaged in a series of communications checks between thespacecraft, the launch team and Mission Control in Houston.

Stormyweather conditions along Florida's Space Coast, typical for mid-July, arecontinuing through today's countdown ? at this time, a lightning advisory hasbeen issued for Launch Complex 39. The official weather forecast remains peggedat an optimistic 60 percent probability of acceptable conditions for launch ?the primary concern is the potential formation of showers and thunderstormswithin 20 nautical miles of the Shuttle Landing Facility.

-- Roger Guillemette

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TVduring launch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

EndeavourCommander Enters Spacecraft
15 July 2009 2:37 p.m. EDT

NASA'sSTS-127 mission commander Mark Polansky has climbed onboardshuttle Endeavour for this afternoon's plannedlaunch attempt at 6:03:10 p.m. EDT (2203:10 GMT). STS-127 will be Polansky'sthird spaceflight. Watch the launch live via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast.

No technicalissues are currently being worked for this evening's launch attempt and thestormy weather conditions along Florida's Space Coast are gradually improving.Meteorologists are closely watching for the formation of showers andthunderstorms within 20 nautical miles of the Shuttle Landing Facility.

Atthis time, shuttle Endeavour is fully fueled for launch and the vehicle is in"stable replenish" mode, with propellants being topped-off untillaunch time. Earlier today, technicians loaded Endeavour's 15-story externalfuel tank with the super-chilled liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that willfeed its three main engines during the 8.5-minute ascent into space. Fuelingoperations ended at 11:39 a.m. EDT (1539 GMT) with more than 500,000 gallons ofcryogenic propellant loaded into the fuel tank.

Endeavour will set sail on its 23rdmission to deliver the final components of the Japan's Kibo laboratory to the ISS. The labwill provide a type of "front porch" for experiments in the exposedenvironment, and a robotic arm that will be attached to the Kibo Pressurized Module and used toposition experiments outside the station. The mission will include fivespacewalks.

STS-127 is the 29th shuttle missionto the International Space Station.

-- Roger Guillemette

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TVduring launch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

?Endeavour Astronauts Arrive at Launch Pad
15 July 2009 2:30 p.m. EDT 

CAPE CANAVERAL,Fla. ? The seven STS-127 astronauts have arrived at Pad 39A where shuttleEndeavour awaits a 6:03:10 p.m. EDT (2203:10 GMT) liftoff. Watch the launchattempt live via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast.

Theastronauts will enter Endeavour one by one, beginning with veteran shuttlecommander Mark Polansky, to prepare for this evening's launchattempt.

Thelaunch team is not working any technical issues and the countdown so far hasbeen smooth and uneventful. The Final Inspection Team, also known as the"Ice Team", has not found any unusual build-up of ice or damage to theExternal Tank.

The official weather forecastremains pegged at an optimistic 60 percent probability of acceptable conditionsfor launch ?the primaryconcern is the possible formation of showers and thunderstorms within 20nautical miles of the Shuttle Landing Facility. The current weather conditionsat the launch site are improving, although conditions are currently 'No Go' dueto cumulus clouds and electrically charged atmosphere (field mills).

Weatherconditions at all three Trans-Oceanic Abort Landing (TAL) sites in Zaragoza and Moron,Spain and Istres,France are both observed and forecast 'Green' or 'Go' to support a launchattempt this evening.

-- Roger Guillemette

NASA will broadcast Endeavour'sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV duringlaunch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

?Endeavour Astronauts Depart for Launch Pad
15 July 2009 2:13 p.m. EDT

CAPECANAVERAL, Fla. ? For the thirdtime in four days, the crew of space shuttle Endeavour, clad in theirbright orange launch-and-entry pressure suits, has departed the Operations& Checkout (O&C) Building at the Kennedy Space Center. The sevenastronauts, riding in their silver 'Astro Van', are now en route tothe seaside pad 39A where the shuttle is poised for launch, framed by puffyclouds and blue skies. Watch the launch attempt live via SPACE.com?s NASA TV webcast.

Aftera 25-minute ride to the launch pad, the STS-127 astronauts will enter Endeavourone by one, beginning with veteran shuttle commander Mark Polansky, toprepare for this evening's launch attempt.

Launchis scheduled for 6:03:10 p.m. EDT (2203:10 GMT).

Thelaunch team is not currently working any technical issues and the 'ice team'has just departed the launch pad without finding anything of concern. Stormyweather at the Kennedy Space Center just cleared in time for the astronauts todepart on-schedule.

-- Roger Guillemette

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV duringlaunch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

Astronauts Don Launch Suits
15 July 2009 1:45 p.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Endeavour'sseven-astronaut crew is suiting up in their orange launch-and-entry flightsuits in preparation for tonight's planned launch.

The astronauts are in good spiritsdespite having gone through this routine before, NASA said. Today will beEndeavour's sixth attempt to lift off.

-- Clara Moskowitz

NASA will broadcast Endeavour'sSTS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TV duringlaunch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

NASA Eyes Weather for Tonight'sLaunch
15 July 2009 1:00 p.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The weatheroutlook is slightly more promising than in recent days, but Florida's dynamicconditions still pose a risk to launch.

"It's looking a little bitbetter than what we saw the last couple of days," said launch weatherforecaster Scott McCormick of the 45th weather squadron. "The southwesterly flowhas really lightened quite a bit, so that actually bodes a little bit betterfor us. It will allow the sea breeze to push inland farther, hopefully with itthe showers and thunderstorms. We're still going with a 40 percent chance ofweather prohibiting launch."

Endeavour is slated to lift off thisevening at 6:03 p.m. EDT (2203 GMT).

-- Clara Moskowitz

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TVduring launch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

Launch Preparations ProceedingSmoothly
15 July 2009 12:35 p.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - NASA is ontrack so far to launch the space shuttle Endeavour this evening at 6:03 p.m.EDT (2203 GMT).

The main concern remains theweather, with a 60 percent chance of clear skies predicted. Florida's volatileweather has swooped in at the last minute to foil previous launch attempts.

Mission managers are also examininga power-generating fuel cell on the shuttle that may be malfunctioning. Whilethis issue would not be a concern for launch, a broken fuel cell could meanshortening a mission for lack of power.

An investigation this morningsuggests the fuel cell may be fine.

"The preliminary indicationswere within limits," NASA spokeswoman CandreaThomas said. Mission managers are set to discuss and possibly clear the issueduring a meeting at around 2:30 p.m. EDT.

-- Clara Moskowitz

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TVduring launch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

Shuttle Tanking Completed
15 July 2009 11:38 a.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Fueling of thespace shuttle Endeavour's external tank is completed and has entered a phasecalled "stable replenish" when fuel is only added to replace whatnaturally boils off of the super-chilled liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygenpropellants.

NASA aims to lift off Endeavourtonight at 6:03 p.m. EDT (2203 GMT), with only a 40 percent chance of badweather intervening as in past launch attempts. The launch countdown has goneinto a planned hold at the T-3 hour mark.

-- Clara Moskowitz

NASA will broadcastEndeavour's STS-127 mission to the International Space Station live on NASA TVduring launch and the flight. You are invited to follow the mission using SPACE.com?s NASA TVfeed, which is available by clickinghere or using the button at the upper lefton this page.

Astronauts Hope Today is the Day
15 July 2009 10:05 a.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Tanking isproceeding smoothly for the space shuttle Endeavour, set to launch this eveningat 6:03 p.m. EDT (2203 GMT) from Launch Pad 39A here at Kennedy Space Center.

The shuttle's seven member crew, ledby commanderMark Polansky,hope today is the day they successfully lift off into s

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