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In Brief

Huge Physics Gathering Kicks Off This Weekend, Will Showcase Space

Turret Arch Reflections Image
The sky over Turret Arch in Arches National Park, Moab, Utah. The American Physical Society April Meeting will take place in Salt Lake City (a few hours' drive north of Moab) April 16 to 19, 2016. (Image credit: © Mike Taylor | Taylor Photography)

The American Physical Society's annual April Meeting, which focuses on astro- and particle physics, starts in Salt Lake City tomorrow (April 16) and runs through Tuesday.

The APS April Meeting is one of the largest physics meetings in the world. The meeting covers particle physics, astrophysics, nuclear physics, plasma fusion and gravitational physics, as well as talks and sessions dedicated to social issues, energy and security, according to APS representatives.

This year, physicists at the meeting are expected to discuss in more detail the first-ever direct detection of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in February.

The APS April Meeting provides an opportunity for scientists to share new research, compare ideas and forge collaborations. Past meetings have presented a treasure trove of research about nearly every aspect of space science, including black holes, dark matter, dark energy and more. The meeting also features talks on the history of physics. A look into the field's past often turns up surprising stories, such as the one about the time Albert Einstein sort of helped blackmail President Franklin Roosevelt. 

APS publishes the Physical Review scientific journals. The society's annual March Meeting features talks on areas of physics not covered in the April Meeting.

Check back with Space.com for news and stories as the meeting progresses. 

Follow Calla Cofield @callacofield.Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.

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Calla Cofield
Calla Cofield joined the crew of Space.com in October, 2014. She enjoys writing about black holes, exploding stars, ripples in space-time, science in comic books, and all the mysteries of the cosmos. She has been underground at three of the largest particle accelerators in the world. She'd really like to know what the heck dark matter is. Prior to joining Space.com Calla worked as a freelance science writer. Her work has appeared in APS News, Symmetry magazine, Scientific American, Nature News, Physics World, and others. From 2010 to 2014 she was a producer for The Physics Central Podcast. Previously, Calla worked at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City (hands down the best office building ever) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in California. Calla studied physics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and is originally from Sandy, Utah. Contact Calla via: E-Mail – Twitter