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Apollo 16: NASA's 5th Moon Landing with Astronauts in Pictures

So Far

NASA

Across the lunar horizon, Earth rises and the Apollo 16 Command and Service Modules, known as "Casper," floats. Astronauts John W. Young, commander, and Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, were inside the Lunar Module, known as "Orion," from where this image was taken on April 20, 1972. The two spacecraft re-joined after the Command and Service Modules, with astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, inside, failed to complete the circularization burn.

Above the Moon

NASA

The Apollo 16 Lunar Module captured this image of the Command and Service Modules from above just after undocking, with the lunar surface in the background. The two spacecrafts were on the farside of the moon so they were without communications briefly until they returned to Earth's side.

Craters and More Craters

NASA

On April 23, 1972, the Apollo 16 Lunar Module ascent stage, containing astronauts John W. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr., rejoined the Command and Service Modules, with astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, in lunar orbit. Below the Lunar Module is the Crater Schubert B which is at the western edge of Smyth's Sea.

Farside Crater

NASA

During an orbit around the farside of the moon the Apollo 16 spacecraft passed King Crater. Inside the crater strange mountainous features are visible.

Ready for a Roadtrip

NASA

During the April 21, 1972 extravehicular activity, the first of the mission, astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 lunar landing mission commander, prepares the Lunar Roving Vehicle for traversing the surface of the moon. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, readied the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package. The Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrometer can be seen to the right of the Lunar Module ladder and a section of protective, thermal foil lay under the U.S. flag on the craft. Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II remained aboard the Apollo 16 Command and Service Modules during their lunar adventure.

From the Shadows

NASA

The Apollo 16 Lunar Module casts a big shadow across the moon's surface and astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, can be seen in it. In the foreground of the image, the Ultraviolet camera operates.

Astronaut John W. Young, commander, snapped this image during the second extravehicular activity of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission. Using the Ultraviolet camera, over 180 images and spectra in far-ultraviolet light were collected.The images revealed clouds of hydrogen and other gases as well as several thousand stars.

Station Number One

NASA

At the Descartes landing site during the Apollo 16 mission's first EVA, astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, collects lunar samples at Station No. 1. Astronaut John W. Young, commander, captured this image of Duke near Plum Crater.

Bits of the Moon

NASA

At the North Ray Crater geological site, astronaut John W. Young gathers samples during the third and final Apollo 16 lunar landing mission's extravehicular activity. Young uses a rake and a gnomon. His Extravehicular Mobility Unit is extremely dirty.

Station Number Four

NASA

On the incline of Stone Mountain, the Lunar Roving Vehicle sits in what seems to be a deep lunar depression. During the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity on April 22, 1972, astronauts John W. Young, commander, and Charles M. Duke, Jr., gathered samples and images around the Descartes landing site.

Station Number Nine

NASA

During the second EVA of the Apollo 16 mission, an Apollo 16 crewman gets soil samples from the moon's surface in the shadow of a small lunar boulder at the Descartes landing site. The sample was derived from dirt from beneath the boulder.

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