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Saturn: The Latest Discoveries

Saturn, sixth planet from the sun, is the second largest planet in our solar system.
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Saturn Moon's Weird Ridge Rained Down from Space
Cracking a Mystery: Space Walnut Created by Moons Crashing
April 24th, 2014
Saturn certainly has some oddball moons and astronomers think they're close to explaining how a weird feature formed on one of them. New 3D maps are giving scientists an idea of how Iapetus' strange moons actually formed.
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NASA Photo May Show Birth of New Saturn Moon (Image)
Saturn's A Ring Edge
April 15th, 2014
Photographs taken by NASA's Cassini probe in April 2013 show a bright arc about 750 miles long and 6 miles wide at the edge of Saturn's outermost ring. This arc was probably created by the gravity of a small, icy object nearby — possibly a newborn moon.
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Will Ocean Discovery On Enceladus Spur Life-Hunting Missions to Icy Moons of Saturn, Jupiter?
Saturn's moon Enceladus, covered in snow and ice, resembles a perfectly packed snowball in this image from NASA's Cassini mission released on Dec. 23, 2013.
April 4th, 2014
Saturn's moon Enceladus and the Jupiter satellite Europa both harbor subsurface seas and should be studied much more closer in the future, researchers say.
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Space History Photo: Repair to the Huygens Probe
space history, nasa, probes
March 31st, 2014
NASA technicians at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory inspect and repair damage inside the Huygens probe before its successful launch.
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Brightest Planets in April's Night Sky: See Mars, Jupiter and More
This NASA graphic shows the location of Mars in early April at 8 p.m. local time. Mars will reach opposition on April 8, 2014.
April 7th, 2014
Planets abound in the night sky this month, which affords good views of Venus, Jupiter and Neptune. And on Tuesday (April 8), Mars will make its closest approach to Earth in more than six years.
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Hidden Ocean Found on Saturn's Icy Moon Enceladus, Could Potentially Support Life
‘Tiger Stripes’ on Enceladus
April 3rd, 2014
Enceladus' ocean is about 6 miles deep and lies beneath a shell of ice 19 to 25 miles thick. Further, it's in direct contact with a rocky seafloor, theoretically making possible all kinds of complex chemical reactions.
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