Milky Way Galaxy Plus Saturn Equals Magical Night for Stargazer (Photos)
This image of the Milky Way was taken by amateur astronomer Scott MacNeill from Frosty Drew Observatory in Charlestown, Rhode Island.
Credit: Frosty Drew | Scott MacNeill

A night of stargazing in Rhode Island proved to be quite magical for one night sky photographer.

Astrophotographer Scott MacNeill of Frosty Drew Observatory in Charlestown, Rhode Island, captured these images of the bright Sagittarius Arms and galactic center of the Milky Way on May 3.

"After a stretch of cloudy nights, skies cleared at just the right time to catch the return of the summer Milky Way to our skies," MacNeill wrote in an email to Space.com. "We had some haze overhead and some minimal air-glow though the skies were to die for." [Amazing Night Sky Photos (May 2014)]

This image of Saturn was taken from Frosty Drew Observatory in Charlestown, Rhode Island by amateur astronomer Scott MacNeill.
This image of Saturn was taken from Frosty Drew Observatory in Charlestown, Rhode Island by amateur astronomer Scott MacNeill.
Credit: Scott MacNeill www.frostydrew.org
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The same day he was able to capture the observatory's first view of Saturn for the 2014 observing season. The image showcases the increased axial tilt of the planet with a defined Cassini Division. The Cassini Division is the large gap between the two most prominent of Saturn's rings — Rings B and A — caused by the gravitational pull of the moon Mimas.

To see more amazing night sky photos submitted by Space.com readers, visit our astrophotography archive.

Editor's note: If you have an amazing night sky photo you'd like to share for a possible story or image gallery, please contact managing editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

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