Space Webcasts: Soyuz Spacecraft Aborts Docking at Space Station

Russia's humanoid space robot Skybot F-850 will arrive at the International Space Station Saturday, Aug. 24. You can watch the Soyuz carrying the robot dock at the station at 1:30 a.m. EDT (0530 GMT). NASA's webcast will begin at 12:45 a.m. EDT (0445 GMT)

The Skybot, which is nicknamed "Fyodor" according to NASA, launched toward the station from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan at 11:38 p.m. EDT on Aug. 22. It will dock at the station's Poisk module. 

From NASA Release:

An uncrewed Soyuz MS-14 space craft carrying supplies and the humanoid robot Skybot F-850 will arrive at the International Space Station on Saturday, Aug. 24, at 1:30 a.m. The Soyuz will navigate to an automated docking on the station’s space-facing Poisk module.

The Soyuz 2.1a booster, equipped with a new digital flight control system and upgraded engines, is replacing the Soyuz FG booster that has been used for decades to launch crews into space. The Soyuz spacecraft will have an upgraded motion control and navigation system, as well as a revamped descent control system.

Instead of crew members, the Soyuz will carry 1,450 pounds of cargo to the Expedition 60 crew currently residing on the orbital outpost.

After a two-week stay at the station, the Soyuz will be commanded to undock from the station on Friday, Sept. 6, at 2:13 p.m.

TV coverage of the launch, docking, and undocking activities is as follows (all times EDT):

Wednesday, Aug. 21:

Saturday, Aug. 24:

Friday, Sept. 6:

The uncrewed Soyuz MS-14 will be deorbited for a parachute-assisted landing in south-central Kazakhstan at 5:35 p.m. on Sept. 6 (3:35 a.m. Kazakhstan time on Sept. 7), where Russian personnel will be standing by to recover the spacecraft for postflight analysis. NASA TV will not provide live coverage of landing. The mission’s completion will be reported on social media and the agency’s website.

Check out the full NASA TV schedule and video streaming information at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Get breaking news, images and features from the station on social media at:

http://instagram.com/iss

https://www.facebook.com/iss

http://www.twitter.com/ISS_Research

http://www.twitter.com/Space_Station

Live HD Views of Earth from Space

You can watch live, high-definition views of Earth from the International Space Station thanks to NASA's High Definition Earth Viewing experiment (HDEV). This live video provides alternating views from four of the station's external cameras nearly 24/7, with the exception of regular and temporary dropouts that occur when the station switches its connection between different communications satellites. Watch it live in the window above, courtesy of NASA TV. 

From NASA:

"Behold, the Earth! See live views of Earth from the International Space Station coming to you by NASA's High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) experiment.

"While the experiment is operational, views will typically sequence through the different cameras. If you are seeing a black image, the Space Station is on the night side of the Earth. If you are seeing an image with text displayed, the communications are switching between satellites and camera feeds are temporarily unavailable. Between camera switches, a black & gray slate will also briefly appear.

"The experiment was activated on April 30, 2014 and is mounted on the External Payload Facility of the European Space Agency’s Columbus module. This experiment includes several commercial HD video cameras aimed at the Earth which are enclosed in a pressurized and temperature controlled housing. To learn more about the HDEV experiment, visit: https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/ESRS/HDEV/

"Please note: The HDEV cycling of the cameras will sometimes be halted, causing the video to only show select camera feeds. This is handled by the HDEV team, and is only scheduled on a temporary basis. Nominal video will resume once the team has finished their scheduled event."

'ISS Live!' Tune in to the International Space Station

Find out what the astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station are up to by tuning in to the "ISS Live" broadcast. Hear conversations between the crew and mission controllers on Earth and watch them work inside the U.S. segment of the orbiting laboratory. When the crew is off duty, you can enjoy live views of Earth from Space. You can watch and listen in the window below, courtesy of NASA.

From NASA:

"Live video from the International Space Station includes internal views when the crew is on-duty and Earth views at other times. The video is accompanied by audio of conversations between the crew and Mission Control. This video is only available when the space station is in contact with the ground. During 'loss of signal' periods, viewers will see a blue screen.

"Since the station orbits the Earth once every 90 minutes, it experiences a sunrise or a sunset about every 45 minutes. When the station is in darkness, external camera video may appear black, but can sometimes provide spectacular views of lightning or city lights below." 

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