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Live @ 3:30 pm ET: NASA unveils Perseverance rover's 'firsts' on Mars

NASA will hold a teleconference today (March 5) to discuss the many firsts the Perseverance rover is performing on Mars and you can watch it live here, courtesy of the agency's Jet Propulsion Agency. 

The Perseverance rover landed on Mars on Feb. 18 and has just surpassed the two-week mark on the Red Planet. So far, the rover has activated its main cameras on its head-like mast and is testing out its driving systems to begin what is expected to be a full Martian year (about 2 Earth years) exploring its Jezero Crater landing site.

Today's briefing will begin at 3:30 p.m. EST (2030 GMT) and is expected to last at least one hour.

From NASA: 

Since NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover touched down at Jezero Crater Feb. 18, mission controllers have made substantial progress as they prepare the rover for the unpaved road ahead. Mission team members from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California will discuss mission “firsts” achieved so far and those to come in a media teleconference at 3:30 p.m. EST (12:30 p.m. PST) Friday, March 5.

The teleconference audio and accompanying visuals will stream live on the NASA JPL YouTube channel.

Discussing the rover’s progress will be:

Members of the media and public also may ask questions on social media during the teleconference using #CountdownToMars.

Since landing, NASA’s largest, most sophisticated Mars rover yet has gone through checks on every system and subsystem and sent back thousands of images from Jezero Crater. These checks will continue in the coming days, and the rover will make its first drives. Each system checkout and milestone completed marks a significant step forward as the rover prepares for surface operations. The primary mission is slated for one Martian year, or 687 Earth days.

To learn more about Perseverance, visit:

https://nasa.gov/perseverance

and

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

'ISS Live!' Tune in to the space station

Find out what the astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station are up to by tuning in to the "ISS Live" broadcast. Hear conversations between the crew and mission controllers on Earth and watch them work inside the U.S. segment of the orbiting laboratory. When the crew is off duty, you can enjoy live views of Earth from Space. You can watch and listen in the window below, courtesy of NASA.

From NASA:

"Live video from the International Space Station includes internal views when the crew is on-duty and Earth views at other times. The video is accompanied by audio of conversations between the crew and Mission Control. This video is only available when the space station is in contact with the ground. During 'loss of signal' periods, viewers will see a blue screen.

"Since the station orbits the Earth once every 90 minutes, it experiences a sunrise or a sunset about every 45 minutes. When the station is in darkness, external camera video may appear black, but can sometimes provide spectacular views of lightning or city lights below." 

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  • The Exoplanets Channel
    It will be exciting!
    Reply
  • rod
    The Exoplanets Channel said:
    It will be exciting!

    It could also be more issues for stargazing too :)
    Reply
  • Postman1
    rod said:
    It could also be more issues for stargazing too :)
    All the more reason to build telescopes on the far side of the Moon.
    Reply
  • whatdoctor
    I have been watching space launches since 1969 and I still find them exciting.
    Reply
  • Moondaya
    for sure

    Each progress about space was and will be exciting! I wish to see days when base set up on the moon.
    Reply
  • jimmiy
    Reply
  • Castacon79
    New here so I can get the world to see if they can do something
    Reply
  • Erik
    rod said:
    It could also be more issues for stargazing too :)
    adapt, exceed....or die... When/if teleportation appears will anyone have any concern for travel agents, common carriers or taxi/uber drivers?
    Reply
  • Dan41273
    I don't want to burst any bubbles, but the water is from earth shedding the vapor into space, and some of it collects on the moon, and throughout space......
    Reply
  • Hughjer
    Annnnnd... aborted again. Maybe tomorrow folks.
    Reply