Skip to main content

Watch live @ 9 pm ET: SpaceX launching 60 Starlink internet satellites

SpaceX will launch 60 new Starlink internet satellites into orbit on a used Falcon 9 rocket Tuesday night (Nov. 24) and you can watch it live online here, courtesy of SpaceX. Liftoff is set for 9:13 p.m. EST (0213 Nov. 25 GMT) from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. 

Originally scheduled for Sunday (Nov. 22), the launch was scrubbed 30 minutes before liftoff to allow time for additional system checks. A backup launch window on Monday was again delayed to Tuesday due to bad weather. 

The Falcon 9 rocket on this flight is making its seventh flight to space in a milestone for SpaceX's reusability effort. It launched the Telstar 18 VANTAGE satellite in September 2018, the Iridium-8 mission in January 2019 and four Starlink missions in May 2019, January of this, June and August.

This mission will be SpaceX's 16th batch of Starlink satellites to fly in orbit. SpaceX's webcast for the launch will begin about 15 minutes before liftoff (about 9:41 p.m. EST/0242 GMT). You can watch the launch in the window above or directly from SpaceX via its YouTube channel and launch website.

From SpaceX:

SpaceX is targeting Tuesday, November 24 for launch of its sixteenth Starlink mission, which will launch 60 Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The instantaneous launch window is at 9:13 p.m. EST, or 02:13 UTC on Wednesday, November 25.

The Falcon 9 first stage rocket booster supporting this mission previously flew on six other missions: the Telstar 18 VANTAGE mission in September 2018, the Iridium-8 mission in January 2019, and four Starlink missions in May 2019, January 2020, June 2020, and August 2020. Following stage separation, SpaceX will land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship, which will be located in the Atlantic Ocean. One half of Falcon 9’s fairing previously supported a mission, and the other half previously two.

You can watch a live webcast of this mission, which will begin about 15 minutes prior to liftoff, by clicking “watch” above.

Last month, SpaceX launched its “Better Than Nothing Beta” test program. Service invites were sent to a portion of those who requested availability updates on Starlink.com and who live in serviceable areas. A couple weeks ago, Canada granted Starlink regulatory approval and SpaceX has now rolled out the service to parts of southern Canada.

If you would like to learn more about the service, please visit the Reddit AMA SpaceX engineers recently participated in.

DELAYED: ULA Delta IV Heavy launching NROL-44 spy satellite

Update for Sept. 30, 11:59 p.m. EDT:  The launch attempt was scrubbed after the rocket's Terminal Countdown Sequencer Rack detected an issue. A new launch target has not been announced.

A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office Wednesday night (Sept. 30). 

The mission, titled NROL-44, will lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, at 11:54 p.m. EDT (0354 GMT on Oct. 1). Watch it live in the window above, courtesy of ULA.

From ULA:

Rocket: Delta IV Heavy
Mission: NROL-44 Launch
Date: Sun., Sept. 27, 2020
Launch Time: 12:10 a.m. EDT
Launch Location: Space Launch Complex-37, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

Mission Information: A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta IV Heavy rocket will launch the NROL-44 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). Liftoff will occur from Space Launch Complex-37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

Launch Notes: This will be 141st mission for United Launch Alliance and our 29th for the NRO. It is the 385th Delta launch since 1960, the 12th Delta IV Heavy and the 8th Heavy for the NRO.

Launch Updates: To keep up to speed with updates to the launch countdown, dial the ULA launch hotline at 1-877-852-4321 or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/ulalaunchtwitter.com/ulalaunch and instagram.com/ulalaunch; hashtags #DeltaIVHeavy #NROL44

'ISS Live!' Tune in to the space station

Find out what the astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station are up to by tuning in to the "ISS Live" broadcast. Hear conversations between the crew and mission controllers on Earth and watch them work inside the U.S. segment of the orbiting laboratory. When the crew is off duty, you can enjoy live views of Earth from Space. You can watch and listen in the window below, courtesy of NASA.

From NASA:

"Live video from the International Space Station includes internal views when the crew is on-duty and Earth views at other times. The video is accompanied by audio of conversations between the crew and Mission Control. This video is only available when the space station is in contact with the ground. During 'loss of signal' periods, viewers will see a blue screen.

"Since the station orbits the Earth once every 90 minutes, it experiences a sunrise or a sunset about every 45 minutes. When the station is in darkness, external camera video may appear black, but can sometimes provide spectacular views of lightning or city lights below." 

Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook. 

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.

  • The Exoplanets Channel
    It will be exciting!
    Reply
  • rod
    The Exoplanets Channel said:
    It will be exciting!

    It could also be more issues for stargazing too :)
    Reply
  • Postman1
    rod said:
    It could also be more issues for stargazing too :)
    All the more reason to build telescopes on the far side of the Moon.
    Reply
  • whatdoctor
    I have been watching space launches since 1969 and I still find them exciting.
    Reply
  • Moondaya
    for sure

    Each progress about space was and will be exciting! I wish to see days when base set up on the moon.
    Reply
  • jimmiy
    Reply
  • Castacon79
    New here so I can get the world to see if they can do something
    Reply
  • Erik
    rod said:
    It could also be more issues for stargazing too :)
    adapt, exceed....or die... When/if teleportation appears will anyone have any concern for travel agents, common carriers or taxi/uber drivers?
    Reply
  • Dan41273
    I don't want to burst any bubbles, but the water is from earth shedding the vapor into space, and some of it collects on the moon, and throughout space......
    Reply