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Amazing Mars Photos by NASA's Curiosity Rover (Latest Images)

Curiosity Mars Rover Approaches 'Dingo Gap'

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

On Jan. 28, 2014, Curiosity Mars Rover used its Mast Camera to take the images combined in this scene. The sand dune in the upper center of the image spans a gap, called "Dingo Gap," between two short scarps. The dune is about 3 feet (1 meter) high. The nearer edge of it is about 115 feet (35 meters) away from the rover.

Full-Circle Vista During Curiosity's Approach to 'Dingo Gap' (Stereo)

NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity obtained this stereo mosaic of images using its Navigation Camera, showing the terrain surrounding the rover's position Jan. 26, 2014. (The scene appears three dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.) The view covers a full 360 degrees, centered toward the east, with west at both the left and right ends. The far horizon on the left is the rim of Gale Crater. Just below the darker, nearer horizon is a sand dune at a location called "Dingo Gap."

Traverse Map for Mars Rover Curiosity as of Jan. 26, 2014

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This map shows the route that NASA's Curiosity Mars rover drove inside Gale Crater from its landing in August 2013 through Jan. 26, 2014. The rover is approaching a gap between two low scarps, "Dingo Gap."

Crystal-Laden Martian Rock Examined by Curiosity's Laser Instrument

NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL/CNES/IRAP/LPGNantes/CNRS/IAS

On Jan. 15, 2014, NASA's Mars rover Curiosity used its Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument to examine a rock target called "Harrison" with its Remote Micro-Imaging (RMI) camera and its laser. This is an RMI image of the rock, which is loose on the surface inside Gale Crater, not part of an outcrop. Harrison contains elongated, light-colored crystals in a darker matrix. The 4.5-millimeter scale bar at lower right is about one-sixth of an inch long. Some of the crystals are up to about 0.4 inch (1 centimeter) in size.

Curiosity Mars Rover from Space: Color

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover and tracks left by its driving appear in this portion of a Dec. 11, 2013, observation by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The rover is near the lower-left corner of this view. For scale, the two parallel lines of the wheel tracks are about 10 feet (3 meters) apart. Image released Jan. 9, 2014. [Read the Full Story Behind the Photo Here]

Curiosity Mars Rover from Space

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover and tracks left by its driving appear in this portion of a Dec. 11, 2013, observation by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The rover is near the lower-left corner of this view. For scale, the two parallel lines of the wheel tracks are about 10 feet (3 meters) apart. Image released Jan. 9, 2014. [Read the Full Story Behind the Photo Here]

Curiosity Trekking, Viewed from Orbit in December 2013

curiosity rover, mars rover, curiosity, nasa, planetary exploration, hirise, mars reconnaissance orbiter, mro, science

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover and tracks left by its driving appear in this portion of a Dec. 11, 2013, observation by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The rover is near the lower-left corner of this view. For scale, the two parallel lines of the wheel tracks are about 10 feet (3 meters) apart. Image released Jan. 9, 2014. [Read the Full Story Behind the Photo Here]

Mars Laser

NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL/CNES/IRAP

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover is equipped with a Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument to fire lasers at targets. In late October 2013, a Martian rock called "Ithaca," that received the rover's 100,000th zapping. [Read the Full Story Here

Darwin' Outcrop at 'Waypoint 1' of Curiosity's Trek to Mount Sharp

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

An outcrop visible as light-toned streaks in the lower center of this image has been chosen as a place for NASA's Mars rover Curiosity to study for a few days in September 2013. The pause for observations at this area, called "Waypoint 1," is the first during the rover's trek of many months from the "Glenelg" area where it worked for the first half of 2013 to an entry point to the lower layers of Mount Sharp. This pale outcrop is informally named "Darwin." Image released Sept. 10, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Curiosity's View from 'Panorama Point' to 'Waypoint 1' and Outcrop 'Darwin'

NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity captured this view using its Navigation Camera (Navcam) after reaching the top of a rise called "Panorama Point" with a drive during the 388th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Sept. 8, 2013). [Read the Full Story Here]

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