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Amazing Mars Photos by NASA's Curiosity Rover (Latest Images)

Billion-Pixel Mars Mosaic from Curiosity Rover

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

This is a reduced version of a mosaic from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity containing 1.3 billion pixels in the full-resolution version. It shows Curiosity at the "Rocknest" site, where the rover scooped up samples of windblown dust and sand. Viewers can explore this image with pan and zoom controls at http://mars.nasa.gov/bp1/. Read the Full Story.

MSL's Parachute Flapping in the Wind

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is part of a sequence of seven images showing wind-caused changes in the parachute of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft as the chute lay on the Martian ground during months after its use in safe landing of the Curiosity rover. The parachute decelerated Curiosity's descent through the Martian atmosphere on Aug. 5, 2012 (PST; Aug. 6, UTC). HiRISE acquired the images on seven dates from Aug. 12, 2012, to Jan. 13, 2013.

View From Camera Not Used During Curiosity's First Six Months on Mars

NASA/JPL-Caltech

This view of Curiosity's left-front and left-center wheels and of marks made by wheels on the ground in the "Yellowknife Bay" area comes from one of six cameras used on Mars for the first time more than six months after the rover landed. The left Navigation Camera (Navcam) linked to Curiosity's B-side computer took this image during the 223rd Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars, March 22, 2013.

Mount Sharp Panorama in White-Balanced Colors

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

This mosaic of images from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows Mount Sharp in a white-balanced color adjustment that makes the sky look overly blue but shows the terrain as if under Earth-like lighting. The component images were taken during the 45th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's mission on Mars (Sept. 20, 2012). Image released March 15, 2013.

Mount Sharp Panorama in Raw Colors

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

This mosaic of images from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows Mount Sharp in raw color as recorded by the camera. Raw color shows the scene's colors as they would look in a typical smart-phone camera photo, before any adjustment. The component images were taken during the 45th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's mission on Mars (Sept. 20, 2012). Image released March 15, 2013.

Target 'Wernecke' After Brushing by Curiosity

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

The gray area in the center of this image is where the Dust Removal Tool on the robotic arm of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity brushed a rock target called "Wernecke." Image released March 18, 2013.

Hydration Map, Based on Mastcam Spectra, for 'Knorr' Rock Target

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU

On this image of the rock target "Knorr," color coding maps the amount of mineral hydration indicated by a ratio of near-infrared reflectance intensities measured by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity. Image released March 18, 2013.

Elemental Compositions of 'Yellowknife Bay' Rocks

NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Guelph

Researchers have used the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument on the robotic arm of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity. Image released March 18, 2013.

Indication of Hydration in Veins and Nodules of 'Knorr' in 'Yellowknife Bay'

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU

At different locations on the surface of the same rock, scientists can use the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity to measure the amount of reflected light at a series of different wavelengths. Image released March 18, 2013.

Close-up View of Broken Mars Rock 'Tintina'

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

This close-up view of "Tintina" was taken by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on Sol 160 (Jan. 17, 2013) and shows interesting linear textures in the bright white material on the rock.

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