Spacewalkers Wrap Up Marathon Space Station Repair
STS-126 spacewalkers Steve Bowen and Shane Kimbrough head out on the fourth spacewalk of their mission to the ISS on Nov. 24, 2008.
Credit: NASA TV.

Shuttle Endeavour Lands Safely in California
30 November 2008 4:30 p.m. EST

Shuttle Endeavour has safely landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, ending a 16-day mission to the International Space Station.

Endeavour touched down at 4:25 p.m. EST (2125 GMT) at the back-up landing site in California's Mojave Desert where weather conditions were perfect for the spaceplane's return.

STS-126 commander Chris Ferguson and pilot Eric Boe guided the Orbiter on its fiery plunge through the atmosphere and hour-long free-fall descent back to Earth, then precisely executed a series of turns and banking maneuvers to slow the vehicle for its powerless landing on the 12,000-foot long asphalt/concrete temporary Runway 04 on Rogers Dry Lake in the high desert of California's Antelope Valley.

Endeavour was diverted to the West Coast alternate landing site when continued instability in the Florida weather – low clouds and thunderstorms within 30 nautical miles of the Shuttle Landing Facility - forced NASA to wave-off both of today's possible landing opportunities at the Kennedy Space Center.

STS-126 delivered a new flight engineer, Sandra Magnus, to join the ISS Expedition 18 crew, and returned ISS flight engineer Greg Chamitoff to Earth after a six-month stay in orbit. STS-126 mission specialists are Steve Bowen (who also served as Endeavour's flight engineer), Shane Kimbrough, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper and Donald Pettit.
 
STS-126 is the 52nd space shuttle mission to land at the California landing site. STS-126 also marked Endeavour's 22nd mission, the 27th shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the 124th flight in shuttle program history.
The Orbiter will now be ferried back to the Kennedy Space Center on the back of a specially-modified 747 airliner, a procedure that takes about a week at a cost of $1 million.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour’s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

-- Roger Guillemette


Shuttle Endeavour Lands Safely
30 November 2008 4:25 p.m. EST

The Shuttle has landed safely at Edward's Air Force Base in California.

-- SPACE.com Staff


Shuttle Endeavor Nearly Home. California Landing Imminent
30 November 2008 4:17 p.m. EST

Space shuttle Endeavour is on final approach for a landing at Edwards AFB, California. Touchdown is scheduled for 4:25 p.m. EST (2125 GMT) and weather conditions are ideal for the spaceplane’s return to Earth. All spacecraft systems are functioning normally and the vehicle is being tracked by radar and infrared cameras at the landing site.

Endeavour will soon cross the Southern California coast near Los Angeles on its landing trajectory to Edwards AFB. STS-126 commander Chris Ferguson, pilot Eric Boe and flight engineer Steve Bowen have completed a series of four banking maneuvers, known as 'roll reversals,' that slowed the 223,422-pound Orbiter’s velocity and dissipated heat from the vehicle’s protective tiles.

Endeavour will make a left overhead turn in the skies above the Mojave Desert, followed by a long gliding approach to temporary runway 04 on Rogers Dry Lake – a southwest-to-northeast concrete/asphalt runway 12,000 feet in length, 200 feet wide.
NASA astronaut Pam Melroy has been flying landing approaches in the Shuttle Training Aircraft – a specially modified Gulfstream jet that simulates the shuttle's handling characteristics – evaluating the weather conditions that Endeavour will encounter on its final approach and landing.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour’s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page. 

-- SPACE.com Staff


Shuttle Heads Toward Clear California Skies for Landing
30 November 2008 3:54 p.m. EST

Shuttle Endeavour is now transitioning from spacecraft to aircraft, encountering the upper fringes of Earth's atmosphere - known as 'Entry Interface' - at about 400,000 feet above the South Pacific Ocean as it begins its fiery descent and a long, gliding approach to the alternate landing site at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

Landing on temporary Runway 04 – the southwest-to-northeast runway – on Rogers Dry Lake in the Mojave Desert is scheduled for 4:25 p.m. EST (2125 GMT). All spacecraft systems are performing as expected.

With the heat on its Thermal Protection System tiles building to 2,500 degrees F, Endeavour is headed on a northeasterly course over the Pacific Ocean toward the Southern California coast, then making its descent over the high desert on its final approach for landing.

STS-126 mission commander Chris Ferguson and pilot Eric Boe completed a 2-minute, 54-second firing of Endeavour's twin Orbital Maneuvering System engines, reducing the Orbiter's velocity sufficiently to drop it out of orbit and begin its hour-long free-fall descent back to Earth. Ferguson and Boe will pilot the 223,422-pound spaceplane through a series of turns and banking maneuvers, known as 'roll reversals', to slow the vehicle for its powerless touchdown at Edwards AFB.

Weather conditions at the landing site are near-ideal for a shuttle landing, with light breezes and a few scattered clouds. NASA astronaut Pam Melroy continues to fly the Shuttle Training Aircraft on practice landing approaches to temporary Runway 04 and relaying her observations to flight controllers.

Edwards AFB temporary Runway 04 – a concrete/asphalt runway 12,000 feet in length, 200 feet wide – is adequate for a shuttle landing but considerably shorter and narrower than the main runway normally used. The primary Shuttle landing runway at Edwards AFB has recently undergone a major refurbishment and NASA managers felt there was insufficient time to restore the landing lights and navigation aids to support STS-126, so a decision was made to retain use of the temporary runway for this mission.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour’s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

-- Roger Guillemette


Shuttle Slows on Way Through Atmosphere
30 November 2008 3:40 p.m. EST

The shuttle has slowed to 16,500 mph and continues to slow as it continues its descent toward California.


Shuttle Endeavour Heads Toward California Landing
30 November 2008 3:30 p.m. EST

Space shuttle Endeavour ignited its braking rockets to initiate a fiery plunge through Earth's atmosphere and begin a long, gliding descent to the backup landing site - Edwards AFB, California.

Endeavour is scheduled to touch down at 4:25 p.m. EST (2125 GMT) and weather conditions in the Mojave Desert are ideal for the spaceplane's approach and landing in the mid-afternoon sunshine, about 3 hours before sunset (local time).

STS-126 mission commander Chris Ferguson and pilot Eric Boe just completed a two minute, 54 second firing of Endeavour's twin Orbital Maneuvering System engines that began at 3:19:29 p.m. EST (2019:19 GMT), reducing the shuttle's velocity by about 300 feet/second (approx. 204 miles/hour), sufficient to drop it out of orbit and begin an hour-long free-fall descent back to Earth. At the time of the de-orbit burn, Endeavour was orbiting about 220 miles above the Indian Ocean, just to the north of Madagascar.

Ferguson and Boe will precisely execute a series of turns and banking maneuvers to bleed-off excess speed and slow the Orbiter for its powerless landing. Endeavour will cross the California coast near Los Angeles on its descent and will then make a left overhead turn in the skies above the Mojave Desert, followed by a long gliding approach to temporary runway 04 on Rogers Dry Lake – a southwest-to-northeast concrete/asphalt runway, 12,000 feet in length and 200 feet wide.

Endeavour was diverted to the West Coast after unstable weather conditions forced NASA to wave-off both of today's landing opportunities at Florida's Kennedy Space Center.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour’s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

-- Roger Guillemette


Shuttle De-orbrit Burn Done; Endeavour on Way Home
30 November 2008 3:24 p.m. EST

The de-orbit began on schedule. Engines were fired for two minutes, 54 seconds to slow the spacecraft by about 300 feet/second (about 204 mph) to initiate its descent through the atmosphere. Mission control reported a good burn. Landing is planned for 4:25 p.m. EST (2125 GMT) at Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert.

-- SPACE.com Staff


Endeavour Cleared for California Landing
30 November 2008 3:05 p.m. EST

Shuttle Endeavour has been cleared for a landing this afternoon in the high desert of California.

Flight Director Bryan Lunney just gave the ‘Go for De-Orbit Burn’ command for STS-126 commander Chris Ferguson and pilot Eric Boe to fire the Orbiter's engines at 3:19:29 p.m. EST (2019:19 GMT), culminating in a 4:25 p.m. EST (2125 GMT) touchdown at the shuttle's alternate landing strip, Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert.

Endeavour’s pair of Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engines will fire for two minutes, 54 seconds to slow the spacecraft by about 300 feet/second (about 204 mph) to initiate its descent through the atmosphere.

Weather conditions at Edwards AFB are ideal for a landing attempt this afternoon, with sunny skies, a few scattered clouds and light winds of 6 knots gusting to 11 knots. Endeavour was diverted to the California landing site when continued instability in the Florida weather – low clouds, atmospheric turbulence and thunderstorms within 30 nautical miles of the Shuttle Landing Facility - forced NASA to wave-off both of today's possible landing opportunities at the Kennedy Space Center.

The STS-126 crew recently completed "fluid loading," a process where the astronauts drink quantities of fluids laced with salt and electrolytes to rehydrate themselves in preparation for their return to Earth's gravity.

Endeavour will cross the California coast near Los Angeles on its approach to Edwards AFB. The Orbiter will make a left overhead turn in the skies above the Mojave Desert, followed by a long gliding approach to temporary runway 04 – a southwest-to-northeast concrete/asphalt runway 12,000 feet in length, 200 feet wide – adequate for a shuttle landing but considerably shorter and narrower than the main runway normally used. The primary Shuttle landing runway at Edwards AFB has recently undergone a major refurbishment and NASA managers felt there was insufficient time to restore the landing lights and navigation aids to support STS-126, so a decision was made to retain use of the temporary runway for this mission.

STS-126 will be the 52nd space shuttle mission to land at the California facility.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour’s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

-- Roger Guillemette


Endeavour De-orbit Burn Slated for 3:19 p.m. EST
30 November 2008 12:58 p.m. EST

Space shuttle Endeavour will land in California this afternoon after flight controllers determined that weather conditions in Florida will remain too unstable to reasonably attempt a landing there tomorrow.

An unacceptable combination of low clouds, stiff crosswinds, atmospheric turbulence and thunderstorms forced NASA to wave-off both of today’s landing opportunities at Florida’s Kennedy Space Center.

Endeavour commander Chris Ferguson and pilot Eric Boe are now slated to fire the shuttle’s Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engines for the de-orbit burn at 3:19 p.m. EST (2019 GMT), resulting in a 4:25 p.m. EST (2125 GMT) touchdown at its alternate landing strip, Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert.

A near-perfect forecast at Edwards AFB – light winds with just a few scattered clouds – convinced Flight Director Bryan Lunney to forego the potential for a Florida landing tomorrow; instead, directing the STS-126 crew to begin preparations for a landing later today in the high desert of California.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour’s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

-- Roger Guillemette



1st Landing Opportunity Waved Off
30 November 2008 9:25 a.m. EST

The first landing opportunity of 1:19 p.m. EST landing is off due to crosswinds gusting up to about 19 knots at the Kennedy Space Center runway.

Mission controllers will continue to watch the weather. Final landing preparations, including closing the payload bay doors, were delayed, while other preparations continued. The earliest landing would be 2:54 p.m. EST at Kennedy, but no firm decision was made about whether to land there or later today in California -- or possibly wait and try for Florida tomorrow.

Mission controllers asked the crew to turn off a flash evaporator system, which vents the water out as steam, to conserve water in case of a later landing time.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour’s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- SPACE.com Staff


Landing Day: Astronauts are Up
30 November 2008 8:36 a.m. EST

The Space Shuttle STS-126 crew members were awakened at 4:55 a.m. EST by the music "Gonna Fly Now" for what is scheduled to be landing day. The two landing opportunities at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., are for 1:19 p.m. EST and 2:54 p.m. Forecasts say rain, perhaps thunderstorms and crosswinds could prevent a landing there. Two additional landing opportunities are available today at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., at 4:25 p.m. EST and 6 p.m.

- SPACE.com Staff


Astronauts Stow the Cabin
29 November 2008 10:55 a.m. EST

Space Shuttle Endeavour's astronauts were awakened at 3:55 a.m. CST by "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star." Cabin stowage began a few hours later.

They will deploy a Pico Satellite Solar Cell Testbed this afternoon. They will release springs that will push the Defense Department’s Picosat into space from the cargo bay. It will orbit for several months to test new types of solar cells. They'll participate in space-to-ground interviews with reporters from CNN and two local stations.

NASA will hold a news conference at 2:30 p.m. EST to discuss the mission status and another at 3:30 p.m. EST to discuss strategy for deorbit and landing.

- SPACE.com Staff


Astronauts to Move Shuttle Cargo Module
25 November 2008 1:30 p.m. EST

Endeavour shuttle astronauts are preparing to move their 4.5-ton Leonardo cargo module back into the orbiter?s payload bay.

The crew will use the space station?s robotic arm to pluck the cargo pod free of its Earth-facing berth on the station?s Harmony connecting node, then move it down into Endeavour?s payload bay for the return trip to Earth.

Hatch closure was set for 11:10 a.m. EST (1610 GMT), with unberthing slated for 4:05 p.m. EST (2105 GMT). Leonard should be tucked in aboard Endeavour by around 6:20 p.m. EST (2320 GMT).

Mission Control roused Endeavour?s crew this morning with the song ?North Sea Oil? by Jethro Tull. It was played for Endeavour mission specialist Steve Bowen.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Station Solar Wing Gear Does Well in Test
25 November 2008 10:18 a.m. EST

The first three-hour test of the International Space Station?s refurbished solar array-turning gear is complete and apparently gone well.

It officially started at about 5:55 a.m. EST (1055 GMT), with the gear tracking the sun for about two orbits. The gear appeared to work smoother and draw less power than it did before the Endeavour crew?s four spacewalks to clean and lubricate it.

Meanwhile, new tests of the station?s urine recycler are continue to go well.

Endeavour?s shuttle crew awoke today to the song ?Fever? performed by the band Bandela and sung by Micki Pettit for her husband, mission specialist Don Pettit.

?Hey that was great music,? said Pettit. ?It?s always great to wake up to the sound of Bandela and the sound of your wife singing.?

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Station Begins Test of Solar Array-Turning Gear
25 November 2008 6:26 a.m. EST

A vital check of the refurbished starboard solar array-turning gear is under way at the International Space Station to test its ability to track the sun for a three-hour period, or two orbits around the Earth.

The test began at 5:55 a.m. EST (1055 GMT), with flight controllers commanding the gear to begin rotating the station?s starboard solar arrays from Mission Control in Houston. It?s the first test since the completion late Monday of a four-spacewalk tune-up to replace damaged bearings, lubricate the gear and clean metal grit from its turning surface.

So far the test is going well, with the gear drawing less power than it did before the repair. It is still drawing more power than the station?s functioning port side gear.

The station crew and Endeavour shuttle astronauts are currently sleeping. Mission Control arranged the test at this time to minimize the amount of internal vibration from working crewmembers.

Meanwhile, new tests of the station?s urine recycler are also apparently continuing to go well.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Space Station Urine Recycler Runs Full Test
25 November 2008 12:23 a.m. EST

The International Space Station?s urine recycler, which takes astronaut urine and distills it back into drinkable water, has run its full 4-hour test process to the delight of astronauts and engineers.

?Not to spoil it, but I think up here we?re feeling ? the appropriate words are ?Yippee,?? station commander Michael Fincke said.

?There?ll be dancing later,? Mission Control joked.

The machine is designed to spend about 4 hours distilling water from astronaut urine, but was shutting down after only 2 hours earlier. It ran about 3.5 hours on Saturday before shutting down.

So far, the urine recycler has been running since about 8:06 p.m. EST (0106 Nov. 25 GMT). Fincke said it made a few noises like a ?washing machine in a spin cycle? for a short time but then went back to normal.

Mission Control is hoping to run the machine for 5 hours tonight, and then turn it off for a 3-hour cool down.

?I think if we can get past the 4-hour mark, I think we?re going to be good,? said Endeavour astronaut Don Pettit, who helped make repairs to the system.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Space Station Urine Recycler Test Under Way
25 November 2008 12:03 a.m. EST

NASA engineers and astronauts are keeping a close eye on the International Space Station?s new urine recycler, which is being tested once more after new modifications were made Monday.

?It looks like we are still spinning and it?s been 3 hours and 18 minutes or something like that,? station skipper Michael Fincke said.

The machine is designed to spend about 4 hours distilling water from astronaut urine, but was shutting down after only 2 hours earlier. It ran about 3.5 hours on Saturday before shutting down.

So far, the urine recycler has been running since about 8:06 p.m. EST (0106 Nov. 25 GMT). Fincke said it made a few noises like a ?washing machine in a spin cycle? for a short time but then went back to normal.

Mission Control is hoping to run the machine for 5 hours tonight, then turn it off for a 3-hour cool down.

?I think if we can get past the 4-hour mark, I think we?re going to be good,? said Endeavour astronaut Don Pettit, who helped make repairs to the system.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Fourth Spacewalk Ends at Space Station
24 November 2008 7:42 p.m. EST

Spacewalkers Steve Bowen and Shane Kimbrough have begun repressurizing the Quest airlock aboard the International Space Station, officially ending today?s orbital work at 7:31 p.m. EST (0031 Nov. 25 GMT).

Total spacewalking time: 6 hours, 7 minutes.

Today?s spacewalk began at 1:24 p.m. EST (1824 GMT) and was expected to last about 6 1/2 hours, but flight controllers ordered Kimbrough back inside early due to elevated levels of carbon dioxide in his spacesuit.

The spacewalkers completed all their assigned tasks, including completing a clean-and-grease job on the space station?s starboard solar array-turning joint, lubricating its portside counterpart as a precaution, and preparing the station?s Japanese Kibo lab for the arrival of an external platform and unmanned Japanese cargo ship next year.

A wrap up of today?s spacewalk will be posted to SPACE.com?s home page shortly.

Click here for a look at today?s work at the space station.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Spacewalkers Return to Station Airlock
24 November 2008 7:25 p.m. EST

Spacewalkers Steve Bowen and Shane Kimbrough are back in side the space station?s airlock after completing all their assigned tasks today.

Today?s spacewalk began at 1:24 p.m. EST (1824 GMT) and was expected to last about 6 1/2 hours, but flight controllers ordered Kimbrough back inside the Quest airlock a bit early due to elevated levels of carbon dioxide in his spacesuit.

Click here for a look at today?s work at the space station.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Spacewalkers Wrap Up Station Gear Work
24 November 2008 7:05 p.m. EST

Spacewalkers Steve Bowen and Shane Kimbrough have finished their work to lubricate the space station?s port side solar array-turning gear, with Kimbrough headed back to the airlock due to elevated carbon dioxide later.

Kimbrough is not in any danger, but Mission Control wants him to rest so his spacesuit air scrubber can extra have time to filter his air, NASA said.

Click here for a look at today?s work at the space station.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Spacewalker Takes a Break Outside Station
24 November 2008 6:25 p.m. EST

Mission Control ordered spacewalker Shane Kimbrough to take a short break while he wraps up work on the space station?s port side solar array-turning gear after spotting rising levels of carbon dioxide within his spacesuit.

Kimbrough rested for a short period until the levels dropped back down, then returned to his task of replacing covers over the port side gear. He head greased up the entire gear earlier in today?s spacewalk.?

?Looks like Shane taking a break did the trick,? Mission Control said.

Today?s spacewalk began at 1:24 p.m. EST (1824 GMT) and is expected to last about 6 1/2 hours, but flight controllers would like to have Kimbrough back inside the Quest airlock at about 6 hours, spacewalk elapsed time.

Click here for a look at today?s work at the space station.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Spacewalkers Continue Work Outside Station
24 November 2008 5:57 p.m. EST

Spacewalkers Steve Bowen and Shane Kimbrough are continuing their orbital work for today?s spacewalk outside the International Space Station.

Kimbrough is methodically lubricating the station?s port side solar array gear in a preventative maintenance step. The starboard side gear, which has been damaged, was lubricated and received its last new bearing earlier today.

?You guys are doing super out there,? said Endeavour shuttle pilot Eric Boe, who is choreographing the work.

Bowen is wrapping up work installing antennas atop the station?s Japanese Kibo lab.

Today?s spacewalk began at 1:24 p.m. EST (1824 GMT) and is expected to last about 6 1/2 hours.

Click here for a look at today?s work at the space station.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Spacewalkers Grease Up Station Gear, Install Antenna
24 November 2008 5:17 p.m. EST

Spacewalkers Steve Bowen and Shane Kimbrough are moving onto to more tasks for today?s spacewalk outside the International Space Station.

Kimbrough has returned to the space station?s port side Solar Array Rotary Joint to continue preventative maintenance to lubricate the 10-foot (3-meter) wide gear. Meanwhile, Bowen has climbed atop the space station?s massive Kibo laboratory, where he?ll install a GPS antenna to aid the navigation of a new unmanned Japanese cargo ship to launch toward the space station next year.

Today?s spacewalk began at 1:24 p.m. EST (1824 GMT) and is expected to last about 6 1/2 hours.

Click here for a look at today?s work at the space station.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Spacewalk Passes 3-Hour Mark at ISS
24 November 2008 4:40 p.m. EST

Spacewalkers Steve Bowen and Shane Kimbrough have passed the three-hour mark of their work outside the International Space Station, but have already completed one of their major tasks.

Bowen is ahead of schedule after completing the clean-and-grease work on the space station?s starboard side gear. He is closing a stuck latch on a berthing mechanism outside the station's Japanese's Kibo lab.

Kimbrough is just about on his schedule as he works to install a video camera to aid in better views a new Japanese cargo ship due to arrive year.

Click here for a look at today?s work at the space station.

NASA is broadcasting Endeavour?s STS-126 mission to the International Space Station on NASA TV. Click here for SPACE.com's NASA TV feed or follow the NASA TV link at the upper left of this page 

- Tariq Malik


Spacewalker Completes Space Station Gear Clean Up
24 November 2008 4:09 p.m. EST

Spacewalker Steve Bowen has completed the last clean-and-grease job on the International Space Station?s clogged starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). The work took four spacewalks to complete by Bowen and his crewmates with Mission Control echoing with applause.

?Finally!? Bowen said at 3:55 p.m. EST (2055 GM), about

Author Bio
Tariq Malik
Tariq Malik, Space.com Managing Editor

Tariq joined Purch's Space.com team in 2001 as a staff writer, and later editor, covering human spaceflight, exploration and space science. He became Space.com's Managing Editor in 2009. Before joining Space.com, Tariq was a staff reporter for The Los Angeles Times. He is also an Eagle Scout (yes, he has the Space Exploration merit badge) and went to Space Camp four times as a kid and a fifth time as an adult. He has journalism degrees from the University of Southern California and New York University. To see his latest project, you can follow Tariq on Twitter and on Facebook.