'Lucky' Snapshot of Orionid Meteor Shower a Stunner (Photo)
Nina Embervine captured this photo of the Orionid Meteor Shower near Allenspark in Rocky Moutain National Park, Colorado on Oct. 20, 2012. She used a DSLR camera with a shutter speed at 18 seconds and ISO at 200. The meteor shower happens every October when the Earth passes through a stream of debris left by Halley's Comet.
Credit: Nina Embervine

The journey was perhaps more important than the destination for amateur night sky photographer, Nina Embervine, who captured this beautiful photo of the Orionid meteor shower  on an impromptu stop while on her way to Rocky Moutain National Park's colossal Longs Peak mountain. 

“I was stunned to find that the last picture I took captured a meteor shooting right above the moon, with the building and the moon reflecting on the water in the foreground. The photograph has not been altered in any way," she wrote in an email. "What incredible luck!" 

She took this photo around 9:40 pm, Oct. 20, 2012 near Allenspark, Colorado with her first DSLR camera with a shutter speed at 18 seconds and ISO at 200.

The Orionid meteor shower occurs every October when the Earth passes through a stream of debris left by Halley's Comet. The meteors streak through Earth’s atmosphere at about 65 kilometers per second (150,000 mph) and appear to radiate from the constellation Orion which is how they got their name.[Orionid Meteor Shower of 2012 in Photos ]

Editor's note: If you have an amazing skywatching photo you'd like to share for a possible story or image gallery, please contact managing editor Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com.

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Meteor showers can be awesome night sky sights, but how well do you know your shooting star facts? Find out here and good luck!
False-color image of a rare early Quadrantid, captured by a NASA meteor camera in 2010.
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Meteor Shower Quiz: How Well Do You Know 'Shooting ...
Meteor showers can be awesome night sky sights, but how well do you know your shooting star facts? Find out here and good luck!
False-color image of a rare early Quadrantid, captured by a NASA meteor camera in 2010.
0 of questions complete